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INDUSTRYNEWS


CONSERVATORIES


ULTRAFRAME LAUNCHES NEXT GENERATION LIVINROOM


Ultraframe, the UK’s leading design and manufacturer of conservatory roof solutions, has launched LivinRoom, an innovative, value alternative to the high-end traditional orangery.


LivinRoom has been specifically designed to give consumers the feel of an extension, but at the price point of a conservatory, whilst avoiding Local Authority ‘red tape’ in most instances. The new solution also comes under one holistic guarantee, giving added peace of mind to the end user.


Mark Hanson, marketing manager at Ultraframe, commented: “With fashion and tastes changing, there has been a dramatic shift in the market from standard conservatories, to ‘crossover’ products such as orangeries which bridge the gap between a conservatory and extension, and blur the garden/home interface. However, while customers like the look and feel of a full orangery, they sometimes find their available funds fall somewhat short.


“With this in mind, we wanted to develop a solution which would


give retailers a systemized, configurable approach to allow them to better grasp the ‘volume’ orangery opportunity. LivinRoom gives the consumer benefits of aesthetics and usability without the need to go to the expense of the current flat roof versions.”


LivinRoom is made from engineered steel profiles which form a ‘ladder’ framework that is pre fabricated in Ultraframe’s factory prior to site attachment to the roof. The steel framing and roof are structurally integrated and the complete system is fully configurable, with internal projection available between 300 and 1200mm. The ladder framework is then clad with 12.5mm plasterboard before a finishing skim coat – once decorated, this additional wall area gives a cohesive and substantial ‘real extension’ feel to the space.


Unlike other systems, LivinRoom can be used for pitches between 15-40 degrees and the designer has a choice of using window frames


below or brick piers. But unlike some other products on the market that rely on brick piers for support, LivinRoom is self supporting and instead it relies on support at both the eaves beam and through fixings to the glazing bar.


“There are many elements that need to be taken into consideration


by retailers looking to break into, or already in, the volume orangery market. For example, questions such as does the roof and Orangery come with one manufacturer’s warranty, 10 years long with no split responsibility, how configurable is the system, can it undertake all of the designs your sales team require, need to be answered. However, we are confident that LivinRoom has all the requirements for the volume conservatory market covered. For a full buyers checklist visit our blog at: http://trade.ultraframe.co.uk/Blog/.”


Available in all regular shapes to ensure compatibility with the most configurable roof on the market - including Victorian, Lean-to and Georgian options, as well as bespoke designs - the system is on the same lead time as the roof for confident ordering and planning to aid speedy on-site installation. It can be used with standard or super duty eaves, with box gutter and bolsters, and accommodate variable pitch around the hip and ridge.


The new system also offers improved solar control and thermal performance as a 25mm Heatguard ‘cloaking-screen’ is used, ensuring it looks perfectly finished when viewed from any bedroom window above. The cavity in-between the glass and cloaking-screen is also ventilated to minimize interstitial condensation.


LivinRoom is the latest innovation to be added to Ultraframe’s long list of industry innovations, all of which are designed with consumer wants and needs front of mind and are helping to transform light and space around the home.


To read more news, log onto www.clearview-uk.com and join in our Forum discussions.


88 « Clearview NMS « January 2012 « www.clearview-uk.com


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