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INDUSTRYNEWS


BUILDING ALLIANCE PUBLISHES NEW REPORT ON GROWTH


A rebalancing of public expenditure in favour of capital investment, a targeted cut in VAT on works to make homes greener, and new models for financing major infrastructure are needed to unlock growth in the UK’s strategically crucial construction industry.


These are some of the key


recommendations of a new report, published on November 24 by an alliance of seven leading industry bodies from across the UK. The alliance has a combined membership of more than 40,000 companies and thousands of individual built environment professionals.


The report highlights the critical importance of the construction industry to the UK economy, representing 7% of total economic output, and suggests it will have a pivotal role to play in rebuilding growth.


In addition to a lack of public funding and poor availability of private finance, the report identifies planning delays, burdensome bureaucracy and weak customer confidence as other major barriers to growth in the industry. It urges the UK Government to press ahead with controversial reforms to England’s planning system and to accelerate planning reforms elsewhere in the UK.


The report suggests further action is needed to widen the availability of bank lending to construction firms and supports recently announced measures to improve the availability of affordable mortgages for first-time buyers. It urges the Government to prioritise additional funding for capital investment, calls for VAT on sustainable domestic upgrades to be reduced to 5% and suggests new finance models for


REHAU’S TECHNICAL TEAM TAKES TO THE ROAD


Members of REHAU’s specialist technical teams have been out on the road recently presenting the latest updates to customers on both WER and DER ratings and CE Marking.


A seminar at REHAU’s regional sales office in Slough attracted 32 customers, specifiers and Local Authority representatives eager to find out more about how the latest developments in these two crucial areas could potentially affect them.


The first session on WERs and DERs was led by Dean Franklin, REHAU’s Application Engineer specialising in U-Value and Window Energy Ratings. He told the audience about the new SEL (Simplified Energy Licence) and how it differs from the original BFRC ratings, and outlined the framework for DERs, stressing that they are currently only a marketing tool and not a Building Regulations requirement.


REHAU’s Quality Manager Mark Gajda led the second session


which focused on CE Marking and the requirements for fabricators who want to achieve compliance ahead of the anticipated introduction of mandatory CE marking of construction products in July 2013.


Mark said: “The informality of the seminar meant that customers could ask as many questions as they wanted to addressing specific


major infrastructure projects need to be implemented as a matter of urgency.


To inform the report’s key recommendations, members of the Association for Consultancy and Engineering (ACE), the Civil Engineering Contractors Association (CECA), the Construction Products Association, the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Federation of Master Builders (FMB), the National Federation of Builders (NFB), and the Scottish Building Federation were all surveyed and asked to indicate what they considered to be the main barriers to growth in the UK construction industry.


To read more news, log onto www.clearview-uk.com and join in our Forum discussions.


topics and the implications for their businesses. These are all important issues for customers and they welcomed the fact that they could get the most up to date facts from REHAU coupled with our free, independent advice.”


REHAU has further seminars already planned for the New Year and will be running others in response to customer requirements.


www.rehau.co.uk


To read more news, log onto www.clearview-uk.com and join in our Forum discussions.


Clearview NMS « January 2012 « www.clearview-uk.com » 63


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