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jobs


were unlikely to be an option. “This type of work involves difficult physical conditions and so it is less attractive. So you’d need to put in a rewards system that will attract national employees. If not, there are many office-based jobs which will have better working conditions or environment and better pay, so these will be more popular.” Khaled Al Maskari, senior training officer at the Abu Dhabi Statistics Centre, feels that more Emiratis are now engaging in what might be seen as less ‘glamorous’ positions. “Many UAE nationals who reside in the Northern Emirates are working in the oil and gas sector in Abu Dhabi as technicians and foremen and these are essentially lower skilled positions. One of the key attractions is that after five years of service, they are given an opportunity to pursue their education. “I know of many cases where UAE nationals, who hold a higher diploma, have accepted work in lower skilled positions. This was because they were struggling for several years to find suitable jobs which reflected their educational qualifications.”


“a Uae national will not always choose the public sector for their perceived benefits, it is in part the fact that a UAE national will want to support the continued growth of their country.”


Al Maskari added, however, that while more Emiratis


are moving into a host of positions, at various levels, the private sector can still present a challenge to female local job seekers. “Female nationals can have a particular problem with


private sector jobs because they can have long hours into the evening and with a strong sense of family tradition and family values, they are not really encouraged to pursue this type of work.” Khalid Al Ameri, a writer on social, emiratisation


and youth development issues, thinks the increasingly well-worn argument that UAE nationals simply look to government jobs for their personal benefits is now beginning to lose credence as the public sector begins to evolve and modernise, offering new recruits the chance to develop and grow – and this is proving popular. “In all honesty, I think the real barrier to the private


sector isn’t the private sector itself but the increasing attractiveness of the government sector and the new age government sector companies that are run as private organisations like Mubadala for example. A lot of these government organisations now have a strong, internationally educated workforce, global operating best


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