This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BARBICAN LIFE


INSIGHTExhibition Review Kate West’s quarterly review of the local arts scene


Geffrye Museum Ch


ristmas Past


400 years of Seasonal T English Homes


Until 8th January 2012


Past exhibition investigating the meanings and origins of many of our seasonal traditions and customs. As usual the eleven period rooms are decorated in authentic date- appropriate Christmas style, giving visitors the chance to see what Christmas would have looked like in English middle-class homes over the past 400 years. The exhibition explores the origins of many Christmas traditions such as hanging up stockings, kissing under the mistletoe and sending cards and the Geffrye’s ongoing original research into the history of Christmas adds a new dimension to the displays each year. The museum will be hosting a number of associated events and activities throughout the season. Festive food will be served in the museum restaurant for the duration of the exhibition and unusual gifts, decorations and cards can be found in the always excellent museum shop.


T The regular Concert by Candleligh t


will take place on Thursday 15th December at 8pm, a magical candlelit evening of a capella Christmas music performed by Bocca Aperta under the Christmas tree in the museum’s reading room. Tickets £14.50 in advance include a glass of sherry or port and a mince pie. And finally, Farewell to Ch


ristmas, the Geffrye’s annual


Twelfth Night celebration includes carol singing, Epiphany stories, burning of the holly and the ivy, and a taste of mulled wine and Twelfth Night cake - Friday 6th January, 4pm - 5pm, free admission and remember to wrap up warm as the


he Geffrye Museum celebrates the festive season with its annual Ch


raditions in ristmas


Geffrye Museum 136 Kingsland Road Shoreditch E2 Tuesday - Saturday 10am - 5pm Sundays & Bank Holidays Noon - 5pm Closed 24th - 26th December 2011 and 1st January 2012 Admission: Free www.geffrye-museum.org.uk


Museum of London Dickens and London Until 10th June


D


ickens and London is the biggest exhibition marking the 200th anniversary of


the birth of Charles Dickens in 2012 and the first major UK exhibition about the great novelist for over 40 years.


event takes place in the museum’s garden.


- poverty, child mortality, crime and prostitution - and looks at many of the settings such as debtors’ prisons, orphanages and workhouses. Dickens’s own world is brought to life with evocative personal items on display such as his writing desk and the buttoned leather chair in which he wrote A T


ale of T wo Cities. But


perhaps the most exciting exhibits are the original manuscripts of Bleak House and David Copperfield. Written in the author’s own hand they are rarely seen and are the quiet stars of the show for Dickens fans.


Museum of London London Wall EC2 Daily 10am - 6pm Dickens and London tickets: £8 (£7 in advance)/ Concessions and Children £6 (£5 in advance)/ Free for Friends of the museum and under 5s www.museumoflondon.org.uk


The Foundling Museum Quentin Blake As Large As Life Opens 12th January


T


The exhibition focuses on the central relationship between Dickens and the city that he called his ‘magic lantern’. London was one of the writer’s core inspirations and Dickens incorporated his love and knowledge of 19th century London in the settings, the plots and most obviously in the atmosphere of his novels. The exhibition explores the social background to many of those novels


he renowned illustrator and Britain’s first Children’s Laureate, Quentin Blake is probably most recognised as the illustrator of Roald Dahl’s iconic children’s stories. Here in a this exhibition at the Foundling Museum we can see over sixty recent works by Blake that were commissioned by four hospitals in the UK and France.


The four series of pictures will be displayed throughout the Foundling Museum, a museum that tells the story of the thousands of children brought up in the Foundling Hospital from the mid 18th century onwards. Quentin Blake’s works will be hanging alongside paintings by William Hogarth and his contemporaries who donated paintings and sculptures to the Foundling Hospital. The museum’s


33


Museum of London


Charles Dickens's Chair ©Ally Carmichael


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60