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BARBICAN LIFE


Then recipes and menus have to be put together and relationships with reliable suppliers cultivated. You have to get it all right – all the time.


Finally in 2001 he left London for Queensland, Australia, to spend time with his wife and children – picnics on the beach, barbeques at home with friends. He did eventually set up and run a couple of award winning restaurants - though without his previously punishing schedule.


Since 2010 he has been cooking two hundred meals a day for the bistro that bears his name, as well as for functions in The Zetter Hotel’s two private dining/meeting rooms and two more private function rooms in The Zetter Townhouse just opposite. He now “only” works a seventy-five hour week. He lives with his family, in Putney, but would like a house with a much bigger garden. His business partners at the bistro are the owners of both The Zetter Hotel and Townhouse: Mark Sainsbury - co-founder of Exmouth Market’s Moro and founder of The Sustainable Restaurant Association (to reduce energy use and waste across the industry as well as among customers and suppliers); and Michael Benyan who has put together the bistro’s outstanding wine


. . . . . .


list with a larger than usual choice of wines by the glass.


For lunch we enjoy three of Bruno’s most famous starters. Guinea fowl boudin blanc is so incredibly light – achieved by sieving the ingredients during preparation through a sieve. Today thin slices of Jerusalem artichoke sprinkled with chives add a firmer texture and a dash of colour (these accompaniments are subject to seasonal variations) and cep veloute is rich and creamy. A meatier choice is Mauricette snails - surprisingly tender - with meatballs in a tomato-based sauce surrounding champignon royale. Beetroot ravioli - looking like little ruby-red and cream bowler hats – around a pile of rocket sprinkled with parmesan is my favorite and so beautifully presented. For main course we have leg of Preston lamb from Lord Sainsbury’s Horsham estate on a bed of sautéed courgette, topped with olives and carrots, stripes of white bean puree and green harissa at the side. The gravy is savoury with a hint of sweetness from using kalamata olives and not roasting the lamb bones too long for the jus. Lemon and olive oil ice parfait for dessert is creamy, refreshingly sharp and not too sweet, wild strawberry sauce goes perfectly. Prices are very competitively set given


. . . .


the outstanding quality of the food and pleasant location so close to the City. £6.50-£8.50 for starters, £15.50-£21.50 for mains and £3.25-£7.00 for desserts. Wines start at £3.25 by the glass.


As the afternoon heads towards evening and darkness falls outside, warm lights come on in the bistro, young waiters and waitresses start setting up for dinner and the atmosphere of the room changes to something rather more formal.


Bistrot Bruno Loubet, The Zetter Hotel, St John’s Square, 86-88 Clerkenwell Road, EC1M 5RJ. Tel: 020 7324 4455.


Opening times: Breakfast: Mon-Fri 7am-10.30am, Sat & Sun 7.30-11am. Lunch: Mon-Sun 12- 2.30pm. Dinner Mon-Sat 6pm-10.30pm, Sun 6pm- 10pm


DORANLINK


Established 1979 Specialising in:


Kitchen and Bathroom Refurbishments Tiling and Carpentry Plumbing and Electrical Floor Coverings


Painting and Decorating All Building Requirements Undertaken Sympathetic replacements for


Barbican kitchens and bedrooms, bathrooms and other furniture


Contact us for a free consultation. PMI Cabinets


Telephone: 0208 493 8888 Email: pmicabinets@btconnect.com www.pmicabinets.com


Over 15 Years Barbican Experience Free Quotations Terry Coull


Tel & Fax: 020 8463 7210 Mobile: 07768 311 277


Email:terry.coull@yahoo.co.uk 27


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