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Nov. 19 - Dec. 2, 2011 www.SanTanSun.com


Relentlessly local coverage of Southern Chandler and our neighboring communities


Riggs Gateway proposal back on agenda


Site is same as former Walmart Supercenter proposal by Miriam Van Scott


Owners of a parcel at the northeast corner of Riggs Road and Arizona Avenue are petitioning to have it rezoned for commercial development, an appeal they have tried -- and lost -- twice before. City of Chandler offi cials are just beginning to review the proposal and predict it will be months before anything is decided regarding the fate of the site.


“The application seems to be a request to rezone the land from I-2 General Industrial District to Planned Area Development (PAD) for commercial uses,” says Chandler Senior City Planner Jodie Novak. “Generally speaking, the request averages six to eight months for processing, which includes city review and work


with the applicant. The applicant has a neighborhood meeting at some point, and eventually the zoning case is scheduled for the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission Hearing Board and City Council Hearing Board. At this time, it has yet to be reviewed by planning staff.”


Kevin Kerpan of Kerpan Planning and Design


offi cially fi led the application Nov. 7. Plans for the project, called Riggs Gateway, include a site development plan, building designs and landscape concept. There are no details on potential tenants. The documents are a matter of public record, so interested parties are free to review them even before the application is formally processed.


See Riggs Gateway Page 6 Massage to better health by Alison Stanton STSN photo


SPAAAH: A wide range of services are available at Mary Lynn’s Massage & Day Spa in Gilbert, as owner Mary Lynn Rana applies a skin treatment to customer Veronica Licata.


Hot stone. Traditional Thai. Deep tissue. While each massage technique is different, they all share one important facet according to one local expert. “Therapeutic massage is benefi cial to everything,” says Mary Lynn Rana, a nurse with 25 years experience who now oversees a busy team of massage therapists at Mary Lynn’s Massage & Day Spa in Gilbert. “It increases circulation, helps relieve stress, and improves lymphatic drainage. There are just so many benefi ts to getting a massage, and these start happening from the very fi rst time you go.”


While each of the 15 types of massages offered is different, Rana says all of them provide defi nite health benefi ts.


See Massage Page 14 Baa-bye, Chandler sheep by K. M. Lang STSN photo


END OF AN ERA: Only about 100 sheep remain on the Dobson farm on Queen Creek west of Alma School, which are for the family’s personal use. The rest of the flock has been sold.


Tranquil sheep and frolicking lambs have grazed – and graced – Southern Chandler pastures for nearly a century, but this autumn the Dobson family’s fl ock won’t be descending the old Heber-Reno trail to winter in the Valley of the Sun. The Sheep Springs Sheep Co., headquartered at Queen Creek and Alma School roads, recently sold off its herd, and for now, at least, the Dobson family is out of the sheep business, and Chandler is, well, out of sheep.


It was John Henry (J. H.) Dobson, grandfather of long-time Chandler resident Dwayne Dobson, who fi rst expanded the family’s farming operation


ASU to Price Corridor


Rambha weaves with flair


Rambha weaves with flair


Business Page 15


HHS basketball preview


HHS basketball preview


Youth Page 23


New Kokopelli décor, menu


New Kokopelli décor, menu


Neighbors Page 43


Clip it! Center spread


ASU to Price Corridor Community Page 4


to include sheep in 1929. The animals wintered on Chandler fi elds, feeding on alfalfa that was too wet to bale, and moved to desert pasture in time for farmers to plant their spring crops. In mid-April, the sheep were driven more than 180 miles to Greer, where they grazed on U.S. Forest Service land. The 45-day drive spared the Dobsons the expense of trucking the animals, allowed their fl ock to escape the Valley’s rising temperatures, and gave the sheep a place to feed while snow melted from the 8,000- to 9,000-foot elevations where the family holds grazing permits.


See Sheep Page 13 INSIDE


Business . . . . . . . . . 14-21 Things to do . . . . . . . . . 22 Youth . . . . . . . . . . 25-35 Opinion . . . . . . . . . 36-37 Neighbors . . . . . . . .43-54 AZ Arts . . . . . . . . . 55-65 Spirituality . . . . . . . 66-69 Directory . . . . . . . .70-72 Classifieds . . . . . . . .73-74 Where to eat . . . . . .75-78


Submitted photo


EXPANDING: About 24,000 square feet will be added to Innovations Science and Technology Incubator for more businesses.


by Miriam Van Scott


Barely two years after winning approval from the Chandler City Council, Innovations Science and Technology Incubator is outperforming even the most optimistic expectations.


The 38,000-square-foot facility, located near Stellar Airpark off Chandler Boulevard and McClintock Drive, currently houses 19 companies with 75 total employees and is already at 100 percent occupancy. With no vacancies and interest in additional space strong, the city is taking action to meet the continuing demand.


“In a unanimous vote, the Chandler City Council agreed to expand the Innovations Incubator by approximately 24,000 square feet,” says Jane Poston, Chandler city spokesperson. “The expansion will make available wet lab, dry lab and offi ce space, which will all be turn-key ready. In addition, three current tenants will be expanding into the new space. The cost


See Innovations Page 8


Incubating success at Innovations


Coupons Inside MONE MONEY SA SAVE


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