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34 ANNIVERSARY attended in recent memory) speakers were Ed Davey MP (Minister


for Employment Relations, Consumer and Postal Affairs) and Mary Portas talking about the High Street Review. MPs from all around the country gave snapshots of the challenges facing their own town centres and some of the work being done to tackle the various issues. “Portas spoke about creating a “vision” for the high street, and the


“golden thread” running throughout was a strong theme calling for town centre management and the opportunities presented by town centres for different activities. “If, by the time the Portas Report comes out, swathes of TCM


schemes have been closed down there will be no one left to coordinate and deliver this vision.”


BCSC FOUNDED: 1983 MEMBERSHIP: 2,500 CHIEF EXECUTIVE: Michael Green PRESIDENT: Peter Drummond (2012) ORGANISATION ETHOS/REMIT: Our purpose is to foster a professional, socially responsible and progressive retail property industry and thereby enhance our members’ commercial advantage as well as promoting the role of retail and retail property in regenerating communities and collaborating with stakeholders to deliver vibrant town centres throughout the UK. The BCSC has an Educational Trust which aims to advance the industry by providing training and educational facilities relating to the creation, ownership and management of property and buildings associated with shopping centres/retail destinations. WEBSITE: www.bcsc.org.uk CURRENT ISSUES: BCSC continues to underscore the importance of retail and retail property in regenerating communities as well as pursuing a low carbon agenda for shopping centres. It is supporting moves to kick-start the development pipeline by engaging with Government over Finance models for urban development and encouraging introduction of the Local Tax Re Investment Programme (LTRIP) variant of Tax Increment Financing. “We need all (political) parties to work together to ensure town


centre health and recognise that retail and retail-led investment and regeneration is a key part of civic well-being ,” Peter Drummond, chief executive of architects BDP and the incoming BCSC president for 2012, says. “Ideally local authorities will become more visionary and lead the


way by seeking to ensure quality of accessibility, public transport, parking and public realm aspects and help respective urban environments connect to the communities they serve. Government needs to ensure that planning policy is clearly oriented towards “town centre first”. If government is seen to be proactive then the private sector will engage. BCSC has been – and will continue to be – part of this by engaging itself at all levels – both politically and with other bodies.”


British Property Federation FOUNDED: 1974 MEMBERSHIP: 380 organisations CHIEF EXECUTIVE: Liz Peace CBE PRESIDENT: Toby Courtauld ORGANISATION ETHOS/REMIT: We aim to represent the interests of all those involved in property ownership and investment. WEBSITE: www.bpf.org.uk CURRENT ISSUES: BPF chief executive Liz Peace says: “From providing places for people to work, shop and play through to playing a major role in funding retirement, our sector is a crucial cog in the UK economy. In legislating the government must be mindful of this.”


British Retail Consortium FOUNDED: January 1992 (from the amalgamation of the British Retailers’ Association and the Retail Consortium) MEMBERSHIP: 151 retail brands and 16 retail trade associations DIRECTOR GENERAL: Stephen Robertson CHAIRMAN: Rob Templeman ORGANISATION’S ETHOS/REMIT: For successful and responsible retailing. WEBSITE: www.brc.org.uk CURRENT ISSUES: “The BRC is not a party political organisation” says BRC director general Stephen Robertson. “Whoever is in Government, we will work with them in Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London, and at EU level, to make sure they understand retail and think carefully about the impact of their legislative plans. “Some legislation is good. Most have costs attached. A lot of what the BRC does in stopping unwarranted or ill-conceived legislation goes unnoticed. What we stop happening can be as important as what we encourage to happen.”


The International Council of Shopping Centers FOUNDED: 1957 MEMBERSHIP: 60,000 EUROPEAN OPERATIONS DIRECTOR: Ivana Mackintosh ORGANISATION’S ETHOS/REMIT: Global trade association of the shopping centre industry. WEBSITE: www.icsc.org CURRENT ISSUES: “ICSC is supporting the industry during a period of significant change and development,” says Ivana Mackintosh, ICSC European operations director. “We are a global organisation and our network enables members to identify new opportunities across the world. Sustainability, asset management, responding to on-line retailing and the refurbishment of existing shopping centres are key priorities for many members and our special interest groups help them to work together with like-minded professionals. ICSC is the only organisation representing the shopping centre industry at the heart of the European Union in Brussels.”


December 2010


May 2011


September 2011


October 2011


CSC bought The Trafford Centre in Manchester for £1.6bn – the UK’s biggest-ever shopping centre deal


opened 90 per cent let in early May 2011, and attracted close to 200,000 visitors during its first weekend of trading.


SHOPPING CENTRE November 2011 www.shopping-centre.co.uk


Wakefield’s Trinity Walk shopping centre


Europe’s largest urban shopping centre, the £1.8bn Westfield Stratford City, attracted over 160,000 visitors on opening day.


Investments’ 475,000 sq ft mixed-use scheme in Newbury, opened.


Parkway, Standard Life


20 YEARS Leading the industry for


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