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NEWS FOCUS: Phantom of the Opera Below: Phantom of the Opera was brought to life by the same companies that worked on Les Miserables; Andy Bridge (pictured) designed lighting alongside Patrick Woodroffe; the Red TX team.


reverse shot of the RAH. Autograph, which traditionally services


Cameron Mackintosh’ shows on a theatre level, provided the sizeable Meyer Sound PA system, and the sound design was done by Mick Potter. The system consisted of MILO and MICA boxes: two main hangs of 18 MILO boxes were deployed L / R; 11 MICAs were used for each of the two sidefill hangs, and a further 17 MICAs provided the centre hang. The low end was achieved via two further hangs of eight 600HP subs, which were located behind the main hangs. A Galileo loudspeaker management system was used as the main EQ. “Because of the way the stage is set out,


we couldn’t really use any of the standard rigging points for the PA,” revealed Autograph’s Andy Brown. “The hall had a set of two-tonne points, which are generally used, but they were slightly too far upstage for us, so we had to come up with an array of bridging trusses to hang essentially three tonnes a side: one in the centre, and one in either side hang. “We needed to achieve perfect coverage


– the aim being that every seat in the house hears the same thing. This is a very orchestral production, so it’s all about feel, not power, and once Mick [Potter] had the concept, I got the basic drawings from him to physically make it work.” DiGiCo SD7T consoles were deployed


08 • TPi NOVEMBER 2011


for FOH and monitors. Main operator Paul Gatehouse, who mixed Phantom for a spell in the West End, also used DiGiCo’s EX- 007 expander on his SD7T at FOH position. Gatehouse got all his dynamics and effects from within the console, bar a TC Electronic System 6000 reverb; and used QLab for playback. Chris Pinn was in charge at monitor position,


which, unusually, was located backstage, due to the size of the set. Meyer UPGs were positioned as sidefills either side of the stage, and 20 E Zeros provided the main monitoring, positioned within the stage floor, under the grills. Only the percussionist used a set of IEMs, and several of the other musicians were using


musical only, whereas this is the full stage play. As a result, the main PA can be run at a fairly low level. Ultimately, my challenge has been to put the boxes where Mick wants me to; he has a great pair of ears, and the Meyer Sound gear is extremely consistent, so it’s worked very well.” Lighting was provided by PRG and was


designed by Patrick Woodroffe and Andy Bridge. The main automated fixtures were by Vari-Lite, including 34 VL3500 Washes; 33 VL3000 Spots; 28 VL3500 spots; six VL2000 Washes; seven VL1000 TS and four VL1000 AS. Other automated fixtures included 32 Martin Professional MAC 700 spots, two MAC 700 Washes, 26 VL5 Tungstens, nine Clay Paky


“We were riding all the vocals live as you never quite know what’s going to happen from one performance to the next, but thankfully the whole thing flowed very smoothly on the night.”


Aviom personal monitors. A total of 56 radio mics were used, each


with a DPA 4066 boom; and a further 45 mics were used on the orchestra, a combination of DPA 4061s, 4022s and 4011Cs. “It’s a very different show to Les Miserables


actually,” added Brown. “That was very much like a concert, showcasing the songs of the


Sharpys, 18 Alpha Wash 1500’s, and a Nova Flower. Conventional lighting fixtures included 42 Source Four Pars, 54 Source Four Profiles, 24 Minuette Fresnels, 15 Shell Footlights, and one MR16 Ministrip; effect lighting was achieved via 12 Martin Atomic Strobes; and four M2 Medium Throws were deployed for follow spots. The RAH house equipment included 120


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