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oN your PLatE


One of the specialties he developed


over the years is a cream of Reuben soup that, admittedly, scares the taste buds on fi rst proposal, but becomes an instant favorite for those who give it a shot.


I caught up with Big Mike in the


Husby’s kitchen in September to get a refresher course on making the soup (I fi rst learned how when we shared the same line about 10 years ago).


“It’s a nice hearty, cool weather soup.


It goes hand-in-hand with chili. I like to make it as close to eating an actual Reu- ben as possible,” Mike says as he makes a restaurant-scaled, fi ve-gallon batch.


On busy fall Saturdays, with the bar


packed full of red-clad Badger fans, Big Mike has to please the masses. At home for my own Saturday party, I simply have to please myself and – if I’m being generous – a few buddies.


Mike Meyer started cooking at the foot of his mother at his parents’ tavern when he was 10 before his brother Doug became his culinary mentor. He now prepares hearty fare at Husby’s Food and Spirits in Sister Bay. Photo by Sarah Doneff .


Turn the heat up to medium-high just long enough for it to begin to boil, stirring occasionally. Once the base is hot, mix in the roux to thicken the base. You want to thicken the soup, but be careful to not turn it into sludge.


With the soup hot – not boiling – add Swiss cheese one slice at a time, stirring as you add to make sure the cheese dissolves fully into the base (if it doesn’t dissolve it will sink to the bottom of the pot and burn).


Add corned beef, onions, celery and sauerkraut and let the soup sit on medium-low heat for 30 minutes, stirring oc- casionally. Add seasoned salt and white pepper to taste.


Toast the rye bread and cut into croutons. Add the croutons to the soup be- fore you serve and enjoy a hearty soup perfect for late fall and winter!


doorcountyliving.com


Winter 2011/2012 Door County Living 69


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