This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
camEos KB: A lot of the properties that I’ve


been at have history, but the history of Peninsula State Park is so incredible – when you look at the people who lived here, grew up here, farmed and fished here. All of these different uses that took place so many years ago. It has so much value.


BJ: How does your background


working with support groups and community organizations help you at Peninsula?


KB: We’re lucky because the Friends


of Peninsula State Park have been estab- lished for a little over four years. Tey’ve been very instrumental in raising funds, building facilities and volunteering their labor. Tose types of things that our operating budget can’t cover, they’ve re- ally helped with, and they do a lot of hands-on work as well. Without them we would definitely see a void in those niches or opportunities that we can pro- vide to the public.


BJ: On the evening of the Septem-


ber 29, 2011 windstorm [that broke 75 power poles and left nearly 13,000 peo- ple along the peninsula without power, including the park], what kind of prepa- rations were taken to ready yourselves for the worst-case scenario?


KB: We had a meeting that after-


noon to make sure our chain saws and tractors were fueled up and ready to go. We also have an Emergency Action Plan for notifying the campers and making sure people are safe.


BJ: When did you know that this


wasn’t going to be an “ordinary” storm? KB: Between 8:00 and 9:00 pm


the wind started to blow much harder, and then at 9:00 pm we lost power. We only had one other ranger on duty that night. I left home and went to the office to make sure the staffers still working in there were safe and to help them leave. Trees were falling everywhere, a lot of them at the park entrance. But we re-


“What can we do to make sure we’re taking a good look at preserving the park for future generations? Tat’s really my main charge.” ~ Kelli Bruns


ally saw what we were up against when we started to get into the campgrounds. Many people were trying to leave but found their way blocked with fallen trees. We were using the tractor to clear as many off the road as possible.


BJ: Wow. Tat had to be a scary situ- ation.


New Peninsula State Park Superintendent Kelli Bruns. Photo by Suzi Hass.


Photo by Dan Eggert. doorcountyliving.com Winter 2011/2012 Door County Living 59


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84