This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
MAPLE SYRUP FACTS


· Quebec is the largest producer of maple syrup in North America. In the United States, Vermont is the number one producer; Wisconsin for a time was third, until edged into fourth place by Maine. New York ranks number two.


· Each year the Jorns’ operation taps from 4,000 to 9,000 trees (depending on the season and availability of labor) and has “thousands of buckets.”


· Some of the trees tapped at Jorns’ Sugar Bush are over 200 years old.


· In 1978, Jorns’ Sugar Bush was one of the first in the state to purchase a re- verse osmosis machine. The price of fuel oil had climbed from 11 cents per gallon to one dollar, and faced with the alterna- tive of returning to wood as a fuel, Jorns made the purchase. Last season, the sugar bush paid $4.19 per gallon.


· When sap is condensed in a conven- tional evaporator, 43 gallons are re- quired to make one gallon of syrup. After running sap through a reverse osmosis machine, only 10 to 12 gallons in the evaporator will be needed to make one gallon of syrup.


· The reverse osmosis machine can pro- duce 1,200 gallons of water-reduced sap per hour, and the evaporator finishes 25 gallons of finished syrup per hour.


· On a good year, 8,000 to 9,000 gallons of sap are collected at the Jorns’ Sugar Bush and processed into as many as fifty 55-gallon barrels of syrup.


peratures that cause the sap to flow from the roots of the tree up into the trunk and branches. Generally, in the middle of March daytime thaws and nighttime freezes trigger the flow, but the dates vary from year to year, as do the number of consecutive days of sap flow, which range from three to 30 days, although 16 is average.


During that flow, Jorns does not go


to bed until he has processed the day’s collection of sap, sometimes not turning


doorcountyliving.com


in until the wee hours of the morning. Te syrup-making process includes the following steps:


1. Tapping the maple tree. A cord-


less power drill with a 5/16-inch bit is used to make a hole on the south side of the tree. A spile is tapped into it, and an aluminum 16-quart pail with a roof- like cover is hung to collect the dripping sap. A tree must be at least 12 inches in diameter for tapping; larger trees will support more than one tap.


2. Collecting maple sap. Each day all


of the buckets are poured into five-gal- lon plastic pails that are in turn dumped into a screened 2,000-gallon gather- ing tank on a tractor-pulled trailer and hauled to the sugarhouse.


3. Condensing maple sap. Te col-


lecting tank is pulled onto a ramp by the sugarshack, and the contents drained by gravity through filters into open tanks in the building. From there, the sap is pumped into a reverse osmosis machine


Winter 2011/2012 Door County Living 37


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84