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– A&W continued from previous page >>


economic infl uence in the community. By the late 1920s, it was not unusual to see a train leave the Sawyer side of the bay at least once a week pulling 20 cars full of cartons of condensed milk.


John T enell of Sturgeon Bay, whose fa- Photo courtesy of Friends of the Ahnapee Trail.


SECOND LIFE The tracks are long gone, but the Ahnapee & Western Railway line lives on.


A rails-to-trails conversion in 1974 created the 30-mile Ahnapee State Trail that follows the old roadbed from Casco to Sturgeon Bay. It’s a favorite of cross-country skiers and snowmobilers – connecting with 95 miles of trails in Kewaunee County and 275 miles in Door County.


Its fi rm surface is also ideal for hiking, biking and horseback riding, with scenic views of the countryside and many artifacts of the A&W’s history, including steam locomotive boiler culverts, bridges, and buildings that once housed rail-related industries.


For more information on the trail, visit www.ahnapeetrail.org. – Bus line continued from page 24 >>


(Below) Isaacson was constantly updating his fl eet of busses to accommodate more passengers. By the late 1930s he operated busses that carried as many as 45 passengers, like The Clipper.


ther managed Martin Orchards – then the largest in the world – from 1938 to 1952, remembers when that orchard alone was producing 250,000 pounds of cherries a day, and the A&W left Sturgeon Bay with whole trains full of cherries.


T e A&W also provided passenger


service to the tourists who fl ocked to the peninsula. In 1914, the Door County Special from Green Bay to Sturgeon Bay was added, attracting passengers who connected to the GB&W from Chicago and Milwaukee and providing competi- tion for the steamship lines that brought vacationers to Door County shores.


Tourists could travel north from


Sturgeon Bay via Yellow Car & Tran- sit Company’s “Buick Special” service,


26 Door County Living Winter 2011/2012


doorcountyliving.com


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