This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BARBICAN LIFE


The Second Royal Exchange 1669


Source: Wikimedia Commons


old Exchange had been demolished to create the open space which still exists today and there was erected the equestrian statue to the hero of the


moment, the Duke of Wellington. He was the principal guest at the opening ceremony and his statue remains before the Exchange; alongside is a


memorial to London troops who died in the First World War. The large central court has a Turkish pavement, a relic of the first Exchange, and the walls are painted with scenes from London’s history although these are hidden within the shops and restaurants which now occupy the interior. There remains a golden grasshopper on its roof. It was in use as an exchange until 1939 and was then occupied by offices. After a two year restoration programme it reopened in 2001 with luxury boutiques, restaurants and cafes on the ground and first floors and offices above. The steps outside remain one of the places from which a new sovereign is proclaimed. At the side of the main entrance, and just below a bust of its original patron, is a panel which includes these words: “Today this Grade I listed building has come full circle. In 2001 it was extensively remodelled; here are many of the world’s finest merchants. Under one roof are all that is beautiful, stylish and freely available to buy. No doubt Sir Thomas Gresham would be delighted that, after so many centuries, his unique vision has once more been realised.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56