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BY JEAN L. SEAWRIGHT, CMC


NT W


ith a new generation of workers who are skeptical, fun-seeking, and thirsty for praise, coaching and disciplining employees requires a much different approach: one that preserves respect, minimizes risk, and gets per- formance results, all while motivating the individual to excel. Gone are the days of “I’m going to write you up” threats.


In many organizations, rather than focusing on performance improvement, employee development has centered on building a trail of documentation to justify a termination. In fact, in many cultures, it is commonly known that once you receive a verbal warning, you are on the path to termination. There


is no escaping the wrath of “progressive discipline!” Sadly, the entire process has not lived up to its original purpose and intent to develop productive, effective employees. What’s needed today to ad- dress employee performance problems is a whole new approach that includes an “art” and a “sci- ence.” Consider the following five strategies (The “Art”) and four tips (The “Science”) for effectively enhancing performance . . .


The Art


Strategy #1: Focus on the ultimate goal of any coaching session. Sounds simple, but first you have to know what the goal is. Assuming you


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