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NPMA LIBRARY UPDATE


11.3.1.3.4. Vacuum upholstered furniture, the floor under and around the bed and furniture, along the baseboards, and anywhere fecal material is observed.


11.3.1.4. Be careful not to accidentally spread bugs to other sites or locations via the vacuum. 11.3.1.4.1. Discard vacuum bags inside a sealed plastic bag. 11.3.1.4.2. Check brushes and filters for live bugs or eggs.


11.3.1.5. Vacuums alone will not eliminate every bed bug. 11.3.1.5.1. Bed bugs will be located in inaccessible sites. 11.3.1.5.2. Bed bugs can hold tight to rough surfaces and resist vacuuming. 11.3.1.5.3. Vacuuming provides no residual effect.


11.3.2.


Steam treatment 11.3.2.1. Steam can kill all stages of bed bugs when temperatures reach critical levels as outlined in Appendix B


11.3.2.2. The use of a commercial-grade “dry steam” unit can be a useful tool for bed bug control.


11.3.2.3. When steaming, follow these procedures: 11.3.2.3.1.


Place the steamer head in direct contact with the surface.


11.3.2.3.2. Move the head slowly across the surface (about 1 foot every 10- 15 seconds).


11.3.2.3.3. Apply steam treatments to areas where live bed bugs or eggs have been observed and critical areas where bed bugs are suspected.


11.3.2.3.4. Pull out furniture drawers and steam inside, then turn over and steam underneath.


11.3.2.3.5.


Steam potential harborage sites where you see bed bug fecal material.


11.3.2.4. When in doubt about the risk of heat or moisture damage, first steam an inconspicuous area and then check for damage. Avoid steaming heat-sensitive items such as: 11.3.2.4.1. Leather, acrylic, vinyl, linen 11.3.2.4.2. Painted surfaces 11.3.2.4.3. 11.3.2.4.4.


Finished wood, laminated wood, or simulated wood veneers Plastic


11.3.2.4.5. Wallpaper and other glued surfaces 11.3.2.4.6.


Electronics


11.3.2.5. Instruct the customer to allow mattresses and furniture to completely dry before covering with linens or encasements.


11.3.3. Heat Treatments 11.3.3.1. Heat treatment can be used to treat and control bed bugs in: 11.3.3.1.1. A whole structure. 11.3.3.1.2. An apartment unit, a room, or a portion of a room. 11.3.3.1.3. A compartment containing furniture and possessions.


11.3.3.2. Heat treatments typically have a higher tolerance for cluttered environments than traditional pesticide applications


X


11.3.3.3. When conducting whole-room heat treatment ensure that the equipment has the capacity to raise and hold the temperature in the treated area to a bed bug lethal level.


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