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NPMA LIBRARY UPDATE


3.2.4. 3.2.5. 3.2.6.


Limitations of liability (except for gross negligence) for damages from bed bug bites, disease, injuries, contamination, property damage, loss of income, etc.


Exclusions for damages for replacement of mattresses, furniture, bedding, clothing, and other infested items.


Exclusions for damages expenses for bed bug bites and other health-related issues.


3.3. Many service agreement issues are unique to bed bug service (difficult pest to control, probability of reinfestation, need for cooperation, etc.). 3.3.1. All service agreement wording related to bed bugs should be prepared or reviewed by an attorney familiar with the critical factors associated with bed bug service.


3.3.2. All documents should be consistent with best management practices and in compliance with any state and local laws and regulations specific to structural pest control and bed bugs.


4. Recordkeeping 4.1. A pest management firm providing bed bug service needs to maintain good records in order to: 4.1.1. Document actions taken by the pest management firm to control bed bugs at the site. 4.1.2. Document the location of bed bugs at the site. 4.1.3.


Protect the pest management firm from liability and billing disputes.


4.1.4. Document other information that may contribute to successful control. Additional documentation may include: 4.1.4.1. The extent of infestations 4.1.4.2. The level of client cooperation 4.1.4.3. The environmental or living conditions that may contribute to lack of treatment success (clutter, structural deficiencies, etc).


4.2. Various types of records may be used for bed bug service, depending on the site, and may include, but are not limited to: 4.2.1.


Inspection reports 4.2.1.1. Service reports, including product usage, methods and nonchemical technologies


4.2.2. 4.2.3. 4.2.4.


Pesticide application records Specialized treatment records


Some specialized treatment methods require additional documentation including but not limited to: 4.2.4.1. Fumigant concentration levels over time 4.2.4.2. Temperature readings and location of sensors for whole room heat treatments


4.2.5. 4.2.6.


Integrated Pest Management (IPM) recommendations for reduction of clutter, improved sanitation, and habitat modification (exclusion) Lack of customer cooperation (if any)


4.2.7. Customer education records 4.2.8.


Staff training records


5. Technician and Sales Staff Training 5.1. All pest management firm representatives who may encounter bed bugs or be asked about bed bugs need basic training in bed bug biology and habits, elements of control, signs of bed bug infestation, the detailed and labor intensive nature of bed bug work, and how to inspect for bed bugs.


5.2. Technicians and sales personnel regularly involved in bed bug control or sales need advanced training in all aspects of bed bug control.


III


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