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traditional equipment? When I first started I was in Cornwall, and I could not find any equipment or source anything related to hand spinning, of course I was new to all of it and didn’t really know where to look. Once I got back to Yorkshire I found that Wingham WoolWork was 15 minutes from me, and I soon became a regular face there. So regular that they then asked me to work for them, it is hard work but it is my dream job, I love what I do. Although Spinning is a traditional craft, and feltmaking goes even further back, there are still manufacturers creating very good quality equipment for all our needs.


62 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2011


Do you feel it is important to keep more traditional crafts like these alive and if so why? Very much so, I try to pass on the passion for textile crafts at every opportunity, children are always fascinated by how spinning wheels work, and it is a delight to see them messing around making wet felt!


What is the best way, in your view, to ensure these traditional skills don’t become lost? By being hands on, the more we can pass on to the younger generations the better, luckily the knitting & Spinning crafts have taken a huge surge in popularity over the last


five years, combining the traditional aspects of the crafts with modern, environmentally aware yarns and designs seems to be bringing the whole textile crafts movement into a new exciting era.


Doing things the traditional way must be time intensive and some designer-makers use electric spinners, do you yourself use these types of alternatives and if so what difference does this make to the finished product? I have had electric spinners in the past, but found that personally I didn’t enjoy the experience. if I want to spin yarn, I want to sit at a spinning


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