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to work 6 days a week, but if I’m not around, my workshop is always open.


What inspires you and keeps you motivated? I seem to be more and more inspired by architecture and buildings and the effect light plays on windows and skylines. I have recently returned from New York and this trip has led to a new range of scarves which have been extremely popular. I find that positive public reaction to new ideas is very motivating in itself and sometimes a chance conversation with a visitor will spark off a new germ of an idea.


What is the most rewarding / most frustrating aspect of your work/ business? The most rewarding part is a busy, successful day with plenty of visitor interaction, plenty of interest and sales and my own pleasure at what is emerging on the loom! The most frustrating part is paperwork, accounts, threads breaking and not


48 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2011


achieving as much as I set out to do at the start of the day!


Is it important to you to keep traditional crafts such as weaving alive and if so, why? It is vital that traditional crafts are kept alive, I think it’s really important that more people understand our craft’s cultural heritage. In the world of 'click and buy' more people now seem to appreciate handling the silk, asking questions about its production and understanding the making process and its story.


What advice would you give someone starting on a creative business based on a traditional craft? Starting out in a creative business is always tough. You have to have an understanding of the chosen materials and good market research on price points and what may sell. Don’t forget confidence and being ‘good’ with people. It’s all hard work and there’s no such thing as a Monday to Friday, 9-5 week! I usually work 6 days a week and sometimes 7! You must have dedication, and a love for what you do.


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