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cabinet maker and the other a tailor and so, I was brought up to think it perfectly natural to make things. At school there were excellent pottery and woodwork teachers who really encouraged me to develop skills. It was many years before I was able to engrave and print full time but it seems to me that there was an inevitability to it.


Can you tell us a bit about where you create your beautiful wood engravings; can we take a sneaky peek at your workshop/studio? I work in two different spaces. I design and engrave at a desk in a small study in the house, with books, portfolios and CDs close at hand. I like to work in close proximity to my computer so that I can carry out research and keep in touch with clients. I can also stay in touch with other workers and share my projects through my blog and social media.


The Albion hand-presses are in a converted part of an outbuilding. Again, it is a small space but I rather


34 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2011


like that. I made myself a map-chest to store paper and there are shelves to store blocks and materials. The walls are covered with work by fellow printmakers.


End-grain wood must be a relatively expensive material so some modern wood engravers use PVC or resin substitutes, do you yourself use these types of alternatives and if so what difference does this make to the finished prints?


A well made end-grain block of boxwood is expensive but, for me, there is no substitute for when I am engraving fine detail and small lettering because it is a very close grained and dense wood. I do use other less expensive woods such as pear and “lemonwood” for larger and broader work. I tend not to use artificial blocks but I do sometimes use a material called “Resingrave” when I am working on a commercial project that will only require one print to be pulled – that would seem


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