This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
with handmade crafts has led to a new age of up-cycling, making new clothes or furniture from others’ cast- offs or remnants. Again, this is not always through necessity so much as a backlash against our throwaway society and the culprits of fast fashion and flat-pack furniture.


More recently, the UK recession has certainly added a degree of necessity to the equation, whereby many people are learning to be thrifty and turning to the wisdom of bygone days for money-saving tips. New TV programmes such as Make Do and Mend and Super Scrimpers have reflected this sea-change in popular culture, demonstrating the ethos by showing the uninitiated how to cook meals, redecorate the home and up- cycle clothing and homewares on a tight budget.


However for many people these days the allure of up-cycling is the thrill of discovering a vintage gem or ‘junktique’ that is well-made from good quality materials in a way that


21 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2011


is often rare nowadays – and all for a bargain price. Similarly, there is a sense of achievement in creating something new from something old or dis-used.


Victoria Haynes of The Owl and the Accordion has recently set up her own eBay business selling second- hand and vintage fashion, which she reclaims and up-cycles using her fashion savvy and sewing know-how as she explains.


“I want to show people that such clothes aren’t all scratchy fabrics and musty smells and that charity shops are full of hidden gems just waiting to be snapped up, chopped up and given a new lease of life.”


For those that simply don’t have the time or inclination to rummage, Victoria has set herself up as the middle-man, cherry-picking pieces that need some care and attention before they can be re-homed. For example, size 22 blouses that have a beautiful print but are just too big,


the skirts that are just that little bit too long or have stains that need to be shifted. For Victoria, ‘make do and mend’ is as much about a love of fashion as it is of the planet.


“I really want to promote buying vintage and second hand as it’s simply so much better for the environment.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120