This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Instructions: 1. First trace or draw your design onto the stencil card and carefully cut out it out with a sharp craft knife. Choose a simple motif such as a heart or flower or try your initials for a stylish monogram.


the paper or card you are embossing into, so the light from the window will allow you to see the stencil design through the paper.


3. Gently push the stylus or old ball point pen round the design to emboss the paper, take care not to push too hard or you might tear it.


2. Ideally the embossing is done using a small lightbox but it’s just as easy to put your work up against the window. The stencil must be behind


15 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2011


Thick handmade paper works particularly well, as does card if you want to make a greeting card. Remember that the design will be reversed so if you are doing initials


check


you have the stencil


the


wrong way round before you start. Once you’ve got the hang of it you can try more complicated images and different


card stock and, of


course, there are a wide variety of brass stencils you can buy from good craft suppliers. Try craft metal too – you can emboss straight into the back of the metal without the need for a light box and create really cool effects!


Images courtesy of Karen Jinks of Chalk Hill Studio


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120