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IMPROVE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH


TIPS FROM NEIL COLLIER breaking down those technical barriers


Lesson 2 - Taking Photos in Low Light With the evenings drawing in, now is the opportunity to use your camera to great eff ect in low light.


HOW TO GUIDE • Slower shutter speed. By nature, the lower the light level, the longer the shutter on the camera needs to remain open to record the lesser volume of light


• Combating camera shake. A slower shutter speed often results in camera shake, when the shutter opens for times longer than a 1/30th of a second. Steady the camera on a level stable surface or use a tripod. As the camera is stable, you won't jolt the camera and should achieve rich colours and a sharp image


• Self-timer mode. Additionally, using the self-timer on your camera, when it is steady, will greatly reduce the eff ects of camera shake therefore producing a sharp image. Most cameras have a standard 10-second delay, but many also have 2-second and 5-second options; use them to your advantage


• ISO. When you have to handhold your camera, increasing the ISO value (1600 for example) will improve your chances of capturing a sharp image in low light. However, when the light is stronger then a lower ISO value (100 for example) will give more saturation to your colours. With some cameras, higher ISO values can also result in 'noise' on your image, similar to grain on a fi lm


• Aperture. Using a larger aperture will allow a greater volume of light to pass through the lens. Aperture is directly related to shutter speed


• Tips • If you have a fl ashgun with a pivot head, bounce the fl ash off the ceiling or a wall. This will help to reduce harsh shadows on your subject


• If your camera has image stabilisation, use it in lower light or when a powerful zoom is used


• If you are handholding an image, try not to go below a 1/30th of a second. Below this, any human will struggle to prevent camera shake


• Did you know? If you are somewhere rural such as Gower, with less light pollution, you can capture some interesting star images. Set your camera on a tripod and leave the shutter open for a period of up to ten minutes. The earth's rotation will cause the stars to appear like streamers!


More next issue…


DEFINITIONS ISO: How sensitive the camera sensor is to light. Shutter Speed (Exposure): How long your shutter is open, allowing light to reach the sensor. Aperture: The diameter of the lens opening, which controls how much light reaches the sensor.


What’s On In Swansea Magazine | 51


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