This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Restaurateur's son serves


up top marks A


local restaurant owner is one of the proudest father‘s in Abbots Langley after his son


achieved 100 per cent success with his A-Levels. Mamun Chowdhury, from Summerhouse Way,


is a familiar face to customers in his father‘s restaurant, Forest of India in the High Street. But he will have a little less time to help out now he has the results needed to apply to study medicine at one of the best universities in the country. A pupil at Parmiter‘s School, Mamun achieved


an A* in maths and biology and an A in chemistry and history, pathing his way to fulfilling his dreams of going to Cambridge University to study for a career in medicine. But Mamun, 18, admits his results did not


come without their sacrifices. He told My Abbots News: ―I studied extremely


hard and I even had to sacrifice my leisure time to achieve the results. ―I was extremely surprised with my history


Mamum Chowdhury


Photo by Hoss


result because I found this subject challenging, when I received my results this was the most surprising grade. Maths and biology has always been my strongest subject so I was expecting at least an A, but I managed to get an A*. ―For chemistry I was also expecting an A


because that‘s what I need to obtain to study medicine. My main goal in life is to become a neurosurgeon and to serve my community.‖ Mamun is now planning to take a gap year to


focus on voluntary work and do a little bit of travelling. He also plans to continue to have a presence at his dad‘s restaurant, where he has been working since he was 15. Proud dad Abdul said: ―We are over the moon


because he studied very hard. It was great to see him achieve the results he wanted.‖ by Kelly Lavender


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