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Stephen’s


marathon walk in memory of Sue


B


y the time My Abbots News arrives through your letterbox, Hertfordshire County


Councillor Stephen Giles-Medhurst might be looking a little worse for wear. The 54-year-old, who is also Abbots Langley


Parish Council chairman and a Three Rivers District councillor, was due to walk 26 miles to raise funds for the charity Cancer Research London SHINE on Saturday, October 1. Cllr Giles-Medhurst hoped to raise at least £1,000 in sponsorship.


‘I know doing a straight 26 miles walk will be a hard task to do in just one night’


The cause is one close to his heart. In


November 2009 his late wife, Sue Bartrick, herself a former Three Rivers and Abbots Langley parish councillor, died from cancer. He said: ―I was motivated to undertake the


walk as a memorial to Sue but also as way of drawing attention to this disease and the need to still fund considerable research to find ways of preventing it killing people. ―With some many different forms of cancer affecting millions of people it is vital that cancer


Stephen Giles-Medhurst


research has the funds it needs so that in future others may not stuffer.‖ Cllr Giles-Medhurst said he was delighted that


councillors from the Conservative and Labour parties had sponsored him, as well as his fellow Lib Dem councillors, and family and friends. ―While I think I am reasonably fit, being a


regular gym attender at Woodside Leisure Centre and delivering my regular newsletters to my residents, I know doing a straight 26 miles walk will be a hard task to do in just one night. ―I am determined to make it — no matter how


long it takes,‖ he said before the event. To contribute towards the councillor‘s


charitable total, make a donation by visiting www.sponsormetoshine.org/sgm.


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