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Peeler crab: Is just about the most crab re- sistant bait there is - Whilst crabs definitely eat crabs there are times when crab flesh will be ignored, especially when the crabs are peeling and the cock crabs are looking for a mate. Peeler crab is also the most ver- satile and scented bait that is crab resistant and will stay on the hook longer and be eaten by the more species than any other bait.


small mackerel are better than slivers when crabs are busy and if using large bait mount the skin side out. Boat anglers use a section of fresh silver eel for tope to keep crabs and dogfish off and it is very effective.


Sand eel: Sand eel is fairly robust bait that will withstand the attacks of crabs, espe- cially if whipped on the hook. Another way to toughen it up is a wrap of squid, whilst a worm whipped alongside a sand eel is a great cocktail. Simply use elastic cotton to strap the worm the length of the sand eel for a parallel cocktail.


Worm: All of the marine worms are easy prey for crabs and being soft they can be removed in minutes. A good tip when fish- ing for flounders in an estuary apart from adding a few float beads to the snood near the hook to lift the bait off the bottom is to use the head section of the largest rag worm you can find. You can also strap sev- eral lugworms together on a baiting needle using elastic cotton for a tougher worm sau- sage.


Fish: Most of the fish baits seem to be an instant crab attractor and they don’t last that long if used in small slivers. Cutlets of


Squid: Perhaps the most crab resistant bait although a large offering of squid is not every species ideal bait and so its use as a crab deterrent is not often worthwhile ex- cept for the larger specimens like cod, bass, conger etc.


I Shoot and Fish E-Zine October 2011


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