This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Miksch 1771


House A New F o c u s The Miksch House, built in 1771, is the earliest single-family residence in Salem.


Many of the projects involved working the


land, from tobacco, cabbage, turnips, and dried fruit to selling garden seeds and young fruit trees for other Salem gardens.


town of Salem, it has served many owners and purposes. This autumn the simple house just north of Salem Square assumes a new role in the re-telling of the history of Brother Matthew and Sister Henrietta Miksch’s Moravian community. The Miksches, and eventually their daughter


I


Martha, with the guidance and aid of the Salem Board of Supervisors, conducted a wide range of entrepreneurial businesses in and around their small house. Many of the projects involved working the land, from tobacco (Brother Matthew’s most successful venture), cabbage, turnips, and dried fruit to selling garden seeds and young fruit trees for other Salem gardens. He also farmed the open land of Salem Square from 1772 to 1775. The Miksch House now serves as the jumping-


off point for garden-focused tours. In addition, it features interpretation for regular visitors, with interpreters portraying Brother and Sister Miksch connecting the activities of the garden to those of the house and the business. John Larson, vice president of restoration,


refers to the Miksch House—an iconic early exhibit building for Old Salem—as the perfect place to introduce the domestic family garden lot. “We’ve always done a lovely job of growing gar- dens in Old Salem, and many of them are well- established now,” Larson says. “But we believe the new use of the Miksch House allows us to educate more formally our visitors about the use of the garden and how it tied to everyday life.” Staffer Martha Hartley will program lectures


and other opportunities related to the horticul- ture program as it is seen at the Miksch House and elsewhere in the district. A new exhibit in the house will help introduce Salem’s gardens to visitors. Meanwhile, Old Salem’s trades depart- ment has included gardening—a trade of great importance to the survival and success of a fron- tier town—as part of their interpretation.


28 Old Salem Museums & Gardens


n the 240 years since the Miksch House became the first single-family residence in the


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36