This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Issue 18, October/November


FOCUS INTERXION


iStream’s satellite dishes on top of Interxion Brick Lane


Interxion also helped iStream set up a very large satellite dish array on the roof of the Brick Lane data center — two 3.7m dishes and two smaller antennas for acquiring high-defi nition content across the European and Middle East regions. “We would have had trouble getting permits for such large dishes elsewhere, given the central London location,” Siddiqui says.


WORKING IN A DATA CENTER


It all sounds great, but there is a side to this that could give a data center operator the chills. SuperNAP implemented an innovative cooling system — T-SCIF — in its facility, which monitors temperatures in every rack cabinet and isolates air in the hot and cold aisles, sucking away hot air, recycling it and returning the chilled air to where it is needed on demand. “This meant we did not have to work in a data center environment wearing hoodies and ear protection to overcome the effects of 65-mile-per-hour chilled air,” Siddiqui says.


The solution was designed by Called HAC, or Hot Aisle


Containment, Brick Lane for iStreamPlanet as a fi rst.


In total, iStream has taken a 500 sq ft private suite, in which it has a thermally and acoustically isolated data center, broadcast control room, production suite and offi ces. It provides a quiet, comfortable environment for iStream’s staff, according to Siddiqui. The control room is sound proof. It has dark walls and furnishings to mitigate light and features a video wall, with three large fl atscreens showing 32 depictions of various stages of signal acquisition from satellite and fi ber signals and relays and conversions.


A meeting room is also set up for clients, along with a separate secure entry for the suite — something that is equally important as the latency for iStream. “We are working with the world’s most prestigious content distributors, and they are allowing us to access their premium content. If we were not completely secure, that video could end up in the wrong hands. “We utilize access control, man- traps, 24-hour on-premise security, CCTV, as well as environmental alarms, to ensure our systems and clients’ content remains safe. This makes clients feel more at ease,” Siddiqui says.


Reliability is also key. Being in a carrier-grade data center means iStream can guarantee redundancy to all services, and it can also scale up or down, as its business requires.


It is perfect timing to target London as a media hub. The 2012 Olympic Games are just around the corner and the need for real-time media relay from London will be great. Just fi nding somewhere to rent without a data center attached during the month of the games is proving a big enough challenge as it is. n


www.datacenterdynamics.com DD_datacentres_half_1.indd 1 43 27/09/2011 13:35


Using AC drives for speed control of pumps, fans and compressors provides an effective way to maintain the desired air quality in a data centre by controlling temperature, pressure, humidity, air change and carbon dioxide (CO2


)


content. But more importantly, drives can reduce a data centre’s


energy costs by as much as 50 percent. They also significantly lower maintenance costs by replacing conventional pump and fan control methods such as valves, vanes or similar mechanical techniques. To find out more, visit www.abb.co.uk/energy or call 0800 783 7491 and ask for a data centre brochure.


APC by Schneider Electric. it was implemented in


Keeping data centres cool without costing the earth.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96