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through the process by expert hands.”


simply share your feelings, secure in the knowledge that you will be helped


“There are no time limits or schedules; you can walk through the door and


whatever way is felt right for them. The team spend a long time talking about the deceased person. They like to get to know who the person was so the funeral is tailor-made for them and their family. There is a real feeling of attention to detail here, the advantage of a family business that can do more than the large funeral groups, with more time and care.


Everyone at Masters is very involved with the community. The fi rm sponsors local bowls, cricket and football events and provides sports kit for the local junior football club as well as the local primary school. Masters have won an award for the Best Funeral Directors in the South East and belong to the National Association of Funeral Directors and the Association of Green Funeral Directors; they are recommended by the Natural Death Society. Masters have strong connections with all the local churches and services can be arranged from all denominations. An interfaith minister can take a service in any faith, including a spiritual ceremony which


is more about feelings than a specifi c belief. If preferred, a non-religious ceremony can be arranged. As Ian said, “every funeral is different; we don’t sell people a package.” And Sue added that “whatever the family wants, we do. There is complete fl exibility.” Although most people want them to deal with all aspects of the ceremony, some have very specifi c wishes and any request can be catered for. Some far-sighted people put together a personal funeral plan before they die; one lady requested that her ashes be sent all over the world so that she could fulfi l her wish to travel. The funeral plan is administered by the National Association of Funeral Directors. Ian advises people to come in and talk to them to realise the scope of what is possible.


Masters understand the importance of remembering. On-site memorial artist Bridget Powell was carving a headstone in Portland stone (pictured above) during my visit and her skill can be seen in a portfolio of her beautifully structured, precise work. Bridget carves, sculpts and letter-cuts to create an unforgettable memorial that is a fi tting tribute to a


precious life. She can even create a memorial for a beloved pet. A memorial will last for centuries and it’s important to create something that represents not only the life of the deceased but the sentiments of close family.


Everyone at Masters is trained in counselling skills. They also have ongoing training with organisations such as the Child Bereavement Charity which supports families both when a child dies and when a child is bereaved. Tracey and Sue have recently attended a conference which focused on childhood bereavement within the service community. They can put people in touch with relevant organisations, helpful books and DVDs. The team really are a hub where every single aspect can be discussed in a warm, supportive environment. Death is such a testing time for


family. It is crucial to have the right support and to know that help is available, before and after the funeral. Let Masters share the grief and help make it easier, bit by bit, to handle the change and move forward with life. ■


MASTERS & SON Lewes Road, Lindfield, West Sussex RH16 2LE Tel. 01444 482107 | www.mastersandson.com


SUSSEX LIVING 53October 2011


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