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Recipes from our readers Healthy Adai - Gnanambal Kannappan , NJ PROCEDURE: Brown rice


Thuvaram paruppu (Toor dhal) Kadalai paruppu (channa dhal) Pasipparuppu (moong dhal)


Uzhundu (whole urad paruppu) Dry red chillies Ginger


Sombu (fennel seeds)


Kollu—mallithazhai Thokku - Seetha Gandhi, Portland, OR


Kollu (horse gram) Dried red chilly


Tamarind (2 inch pieces) salt oil


Mallithazhai (cilantro)


I N G R E D I E N T S ½ cup


8-10 nos. 5 nos.


1/4 cup 2 tsp


1 bunch PROCEDURE:


 Chop the mallithazhai (cilantro) finely.  Heat oil and sauté the chopped cilantro until the water is evaporated.


 Dry roast kollu, red chillies, salt and tamarid. Grind them coarsely .  Add the sautéed cilantro and grind all together.


I N G R E D I E N T S 2 cups


1 cup 1 cup


1/4 cup 1/4 cup


~ 6 nos


2 inch piece 1 tbsp


Soak rice and black, whole urad dhal separately for 4-5 hours. Soak the other dhals for about 2 hours.


 In a wet grinder, grind sombu, red chillies, ginger and salt for a minute. Then add the soked rice and urad dhal and grind all together.


 Grind the other dhals together and add to the above mixture.  (Optional ) Add chopped onions and curry leaves.


 Add water to get the desired consistency and make them like dosai.


 Adai goes well with spicy chutney or kuruma .


Thalikkirapetti MILAGU (PEPPER)


The peppercorn or the black pepper is the dried fruit of a flowering vine called Piper nigrum. It is native to India and cultivated in all tropical regions. The powdered black pepper with some salt can by itself fulfill the spice needs of soups, salads, sandwiches or steamed/sautéed vegetables and meat. It builds the appetite and has a high medicinal value. No wonder it is the number one spice and is as common as the table salt.


Though what goes into our thalikkirapetti is the black pepper, the white, green and red peppers are also used in international cuisine. It is the same pepper treated and dried in such a way that the color is retained. The green and red ones are the unripe and fully ripe ones


respectively. The white one is actually the black pepper with its outer black skin removed; it comes handy espe- cially in flavoring creamy white dishes like the cream of broccoli soup.


In chettinad cooking, the whole pepper is extensively used to season kuruma, pongal, biryani etc. Its powdered


form along with powdered cumin (sirunjeeragam) adds the quintessential ‘chettinad’ touch to rasams, non vege- tarian kuzhambus, mutton chops, liver fry and even omelets – making it almost indispensable in our kitchens!


Volume 12, issue 3 39


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