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E AT IN Pan - roasted


fillet of Sea Bass with Dunmore crab, crushed new potatoes and a basil vinaigrette


Potato with Fresh


Autumn Mushrooms and Dried Cepes


INGREDIENTS Serves 2 • 2 Sea Bass fillets, about 160g ea • 2 tbsp olive oil • 2 tbsp of butter • 300g potatoes • 150g white crab meat • 4 large tomatoes • 100ml vinaigrette • Small bunch of basil chopped


In France, this dish would traditionally be made with Fresh Cep Mushrooms. I actually picked one in my front lawn the other day, but this was pure luck and in the 12 years I have lived here, this is the first time it has happened.


Peel and boil the potatoes in salted water until tender, drain well and while still hot crush lightly with a fork, add half the chopped basil, half the vinaigrette and all the crab meat, mix lightly with a fork to combine. Then season with salt and pepper to taste, keep warm. With a sharp knife put a small cross cut in the bottom of each tomato,then place in a heat-proof bowl and cover with boiling water for one minute to loosen the skin. Peel, quarter and remove the seeds then cut into small dice, season and keep warm. Heat a large frying pan, when hot add the olive oil, lightly season the fillets then add to the pan cook without moving for 3½ - 4 minutes until golden brown, turn the fillets over add the butter and cook for one minute. Mix the remaining basil with the vinaigrette, spoon the potato mix onto two plates, cover with a layer of diced tomato, arrange the fish on top and drizzle with the basil vinaigrette.


James Costello Beckett's Head Chef


Becketts, winners of the Best Gastro Pub Award for 2011, make every effort to source all our produce from local suppliers, giving us access to the freshest ingredients. For this dish the fish was supplied by Billy Burke in Ballybricken and the vegetables were supplied by Dunphy's of Annestown, just two of our local suppliers.


INGREDIENTS Serves 4 • 3 potatoes • 2-3 large Cepe (or Portobello or any type of large flat cap variety)


• 1 large garlic clove (more depending on your love of garlic)


Eric Théze La Moheme Head Chef


• 3 tbsps of flat leaf parsley chopped • 2 tbsps of duck fat (readily available in most supermarkets) • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper


METHOD Cut the stems from the mushrooms and set aside. Then cut the caps into 15mm slices. Cut the potatoes into 5mm slices. Do not wash either the potatoes or the mushrooms. Additional liquid in the pan will create steam and they will start to stew. You want the potato and mushroom to soften gently and the flavours to mingle, but without liquid. Chop the garlic, parsley and mushroom stalks into a coarse mixture. Heat the duck fat over moderate heat in a deep frying pan with a lid. Tip in the potato and allow them to seal for 1 minute, lifting the slices with a spatula so that most of them have a chance to brown. Add the sliced mushroom caps and turn them carefully for 5 minutes. Add the mixture of stems, garlic and parsley and season to taste. Cover the pan, leaving the lid ajar, and adjust heat to very low. Cook for 25 minutes, stirring contents once or twice. The dish is ready when the potato is tender and well coloured. Serve with roast or grilled meats, confit of duck or just a plain green salad. It’s a simple pleasure but one that is enjoyed throughout France on a daily basis.


Knockboy, Dunmore Road, Waterford City T: 051 873082 www.beckettsbar.ie


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For bookings Call 051 875 645 www.labohemerestaurant.ie | labohemerestaurant@eircom.net 11


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