This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
EDUCATION


Building the business leaders of tomorrow today


QWhat makes a student work-ready?


AFor the International College of Management, Sydney, cre- ating work-ready students and graduates is an ongoing process incorporating professionalism, practical work experience, leader- ship training and a curriculum taught by industry practitioners.


QHow valuable is having a paid industry component?


AMany of our alumni cite our professional industry training component as the most valuable part of their learning experience and a significant contributor to their employment potential. Students should be able to step outside the classroom and put their knowledge into practice. It’s often not until they experience the workforce at a visceral level that they really grasp the content of their course.


QWhat are the challenges in finding the right balance between theory and practice?


ATheory should be the foundation of any educational program, but combining this with practice in a systematic process


is the recipe for a truly complete learning experience. Students need to acquire a solid theoretical base before they embark on their industry training. Theory allows our students to enter the workforce with a critical and analytical lens, and to question and challenge the norms of their industry.


QWhat are the top traits of the next generation of managers?


AFirst, ICMS believes a sense of pride in personal appearance, a professional attitude and conduct are critical not


just in securing the first graduate job; these are attributes that will last a lifetime. Business leaders also need to create a sense of community


in their organization to facilitate collaboration, dedication and a higher purpose for their people to get behind. In the globalized operating environment, managers need


to be aware of the global marketplace and able to identify opportunities (and threats) within it. To that end, it pays to be able to interact across cultural boundaries and accept the nuances of a diversified workforce. Finally, since the advent of the Global Financial Crisis, there


is a greater legal and ethical expectation placed on businesses and the people who lead them.


92 FAMILY OFFICE: ASIA TOMORROW QHow do you develop these traits at ICMS?


AStudents wear business attire and take our professional perfor- mance program where they learn about professional business conduct. ICMS seeks to broaden students’ educational experience through


our community contribution scheme, which raises thousands of dollars for local and international charities. Students can have their community contributions mentioned alongside academic results on their transcript. At ICMS, students are challenged to step outside their comfort


zone and undertake programs such as industry training and leadership development. These initiatives set the tone for a career of learning and development. Students will attend classes and socialize with people from


over 40 different countries. This promotes acceptance of cultural differences and allows students to develop a global network before they graduate. Ethics and legal studies are covered in all of ICMS’s undergraduate programs. Students are encouraged to consider the moral and ethical issues behind any business decision.


QWhat support, such as language and personal, is provided for international students?


AICMS has several support networks designed to make the transition as seamless as possible. These include:


Ö the 13-week business preparation program prepares students whose English is not at required levels in business communication, academic writing and English language to allow them entry into as ICMS diploma, associate degree or bachelor degree; Ö the student service center is dedicated to helping students both academically and personally. Services include assistance with study techniques, exam preparation, English tuition and counseling. It also puts on events for new students including orientation week and the “ice-breaker” party designed to help new and existing students integrate; Ö students at the college also develop their own networks; for example, the Asian Student Association aims to help Asian students get used to life in Australia, and provides a variety of events such as Karaoke competitions and Chinese New Year celebrations.


Tim Maillet is regional development manager (Asia-Pacific) for the International College of Management, Sydney, www.icms.edu.au, phone (612) 9466 1076


THE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT, SYDNEY, TAKES STUDENTS FROM ACROSS THE ASIA-PACIFIC AND THROUGH A CAREFULLY CONSTRUCTED CURRICULUM AND SUPPORT STRUCTURE, BUILDS BUSINESS LEADERS WHO WILL SHAPE THE FUTURE OF THE REGION.


Q &


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148