This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
EDUCATION


On a community mission


When CQUniversity Australia opened an evacuation center on its Rockhampton campus during the Queensland floods earlier this year, it showed how important a university campus is within a community.


I ABOVE RIGHT:


CQUniversity opened the doors of its sports centre to evacuees during the recent Queensland floods.


BELOW:


John Harbin was thankful that his Carpe Diem gym program, designed for troubled youth, has found a home at the CQUniversity gymnasium in Rockhampton.


n the midst of the crisis, when families were uprooted as their homes went underwater and they lost many of their possessions, community spirit came to the fore. With the help of the Red Cross, the


Salvation Army and numerous other groups, people were given hope; and thanks to the university a place to call home at least for a short time. Historically, universities have been the lifeblood


of cities around the globe, providing young, vibrant students to fuel an energetic and educated society. Today, we can add that universities are a region’s cultural hub and the guardians of community spirit. Vice-Chancellor Professor Scott Bowman says


CQUniversity has an important role to play in all 10 regions in which the university has campuses. “CQUniversity is entrusted with a philanthropic mission – we play a lead role in driving economic, social and cultural life in our surrounding communities. It’s a mission that sees us working in partnership with community groups to spearhead a variety of projects, while transforming lives through outreach and education. “In the past year, we have had the opportunity to


help our communities in very practical ways. When local sporting grounds were damaged due to flooding earlier this year, we were able to provide our own university fields for junior soccer fixtures. Similarly, we were able to offer our swimming pool to some of the region’s swim clubs while their own facilities were out of action. We also donated the use of the gymnasium in Rockhampton to a project designed to get troubled youths back on track.” The university is


committed to providing outreach to disadvantaged communities. Through


education programs, scholarships, bursaries and donations of equipment, it hopes to encourage and support students of all ages to invest in education. It has been driving several programs to assist students from low socio-economic and indigenous communities to consider further study as an achievable option. CQUniversity’s student support centre manager Mary


McLeod believes the university has a huge job to do in this area. “In Australia, higher education is not equally accessed by all groups of society. Thus it’s our role to work on improving access for such students through our outreach programs which have been designed to build aspiration and awareness, and also to break down barriers to participating in tertiary education.” CQUniversity recently partnered with the Smith


Family to support their Learning for Life program that provides financially disadvantaged young people with assistance throughout their education. The University has also developed a new fund,


CQUni Cares, thanks to a bequest of $100,000 from a long-time university supporter and former student, Moya Gold. The gift, along with continued donations by the university community, will help support students through emergency grants for those facing hardship and assistance for those who need some help along the way to success. Scholarships and prizes are also great ways in which


the university can make an impact on the lives of many students. This is also a way in which communities can come on-board and make a difference in the lives of its members. Suzi Blair, Director of CQUniversity’s Office of


Development & Graduate Relations says through community support CQUniversity is making a difference. “We’re grateful for the financial support we receive from our graduates, staff, industry, businesses and community. In partnership with them, we are making a difference to the communities in which we live and work.”


FAMILY OFFICE: ASIA TOMORROW 91


OPERATIONS


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148