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EXECUTIVE LIVING


(80,000 Yuan per night per person). The Presidential Mansion offers the most extravagant personal service for any business traveler. The Mansion has a 24-hour on-call butler service, a choice of luxury cars for your use, and a personal masseuse, chef and barber so you can always look and feel refreshed and vibrant.


The InterContinental also runs a number of restaurants to cater to every element of your palate. These include The Café, featuring six different cuisine rooms and many Sichuan specialties, including mapo toufu and Kung Pao chicken. Then there is the Cha Lounge is the resident tea house, with a range of 100 teas to choose from. Alternatively, you can ask for advice on the specialties of the day from the Tea Doctor, the InterContinental Century City’s in-house tea brewing master.


Century City can also provide you with great proximity to local cultural attractions and festivals. The Wuhou shrine commemorates the famous strategist of Chengdu’s Shu- Han kingdom, Zhuge Liang. He is historically credited with


FAMILY OFFICE: ASIA TOMORROW 131


creating the strategy of incinerating another warlord’s 200 ships by filling his own warships with wax and straw, igniting them and sending them at his enemy’s ships. It is an inspirational story of sacrifice, certainly, but in modern-day Chengdu, the InterContinental Century City allows you to pursue your own (business) targets without the need to sacrifice any comforts.


Ambassadorial Suite – RMB6000 minimum per night per person Presidential Mansion – RMB80,000 per night per person Tom Neale


EXECUTIVE LIVING


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