This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
QATAR BUSINESS CULTURE


Keys to commercial success in Qatar


The State of Qatar is fast transforming into an economy of vital importance on the global stage. This tiny state, considered today to be the richest country in the world (per capita income of over US$80,000 per year), will, by 2030, provide enough natural gas to power a quarter of the world’s electricity generation needs.


A


dditionally, this emirate’s far-reaching economic goals and plans will make it a household name from Alaska to


New Zealand. Its rich reserves of oil and gas are not the only reason for this success. Qatar has managed to position itself as a regional hub for trade and investments, sporting prowess, academic achievement, a strong commercial airline, and also by diversifying its economy, is able to participate across many international sectors. Qatar’s amazing successes are the result of


far-sighted government and business leadership. For example, in 2008, the government launched the Qatar National Vision 2030, which is a plan to transform Qatar into a knowledge-based economy, to become an academic leader and a global technology pioneer. This visionary plan is underpinned by three major initiatives, including the establishment of Qatar’s Education City of the Qatar Foundation, the creation of the Qatar Science and Technology Park, and the construction of the world-class Sidra Hospital complex.


What makes Qatar a fantastic place to do business


is the progressive climate that has been created over the years. Qataris have long been accustomed to foreign cultures and traditions. As with other Gulf Arabs, Qataris’ long-standing traits of unbounded hospitality and friendliness cannot be stressed enough. Additionally, Qatar’s strong commitment to


education and research has resulted in a dynamic and enlightened society. Qataris are usually willing and able to communicate with westerners on equal terms, and their command of English in particular, can be of a high standard. Also, with many young Qataris receiving their education in Europe and the United States, their business and social etiquette is second to none. Don’t be surprised to find a level of professionalism and interpersonal communication that is of the highest order.


114 FAMILY OFFICE: ASIA TOMORROW With a strong focus on an open-door policy, when


it comes to foreign investments, visitors (business or leisure) or expatriate labor, Qataris are comfortable and highly adept at doing business with any level of foreign business professionals. As with other Gulf Arab business communities, the Qataris do value honesty, openness and loyalty from their business partners. Business opportunities are either won or lost on these personal and social qualities. Additionally, when doing business in the Arab Gulf region, it is important to remember that your hosts have long memories, so business relations should always be constructed upon long-term goals. It is also very important to pay attention to the


customs and social traditions when in Qatar or, for that matter, any Gulf Arab country. Paying a bit of attention to the mannerism, and being sensitive to cultural aspects of Qatari life will go a long way in establishing good relations with people in that


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148