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AQUACULTURE


Feeding the ocean through carbon transfer


Between 2000 and 2009, a total of 26 per cent of all carbon dioxide emissions were removed by the world’s oceans into what is the largest carbon sink on the planet – the deep ocean. Ocean Nourishment will provide some acceleration of this process.


F


or the first time in human history the world is facing unparalleled shortages in resources vital to sustain a growing human population. This rapidly emerging crisis is exacerbated by climate change. Global food security is now at risk. Great improvements


have been made in food production on land, however, future efforts to increase total yield will be constrained by the rising costs of fuel, water scarcity and the impacts of climate change including drought, wildfire and soil erosion. In contrast improvements in ocean harvest have not


been realised and primitive capture techniques have dominated. Ocean Nourishment represents a more sophisticated means of ocean resource management including open ocean ranching of fish. While carbon dioxide (CO2


) in the atmosphere contributes to global warming, CO2 in the stable reaches


of the deep ocean does not. The carbon stored today in the deep ocean is 50 times larger than that in the atmosphere. The deep ocean being unsaturated with carbon is able to permanently (up to 1000 years) and safely remove this waste product from the burning of fossil fuels.


The technology Ocean Nourishment is a licensed process providing missing macronutrients to barren areas of the open ocean in order to enhance biological productivity (marine plant growth) and hence sequester carbon and grow food. The additional nutrients stimulate further growth of existing marine plants at the base of the marine food chain and their increased growth both absorbs CO2


from


the atmosphere by photosynthesis and stimulates the marine food web. Of the additional plant material, some will become high quality protein, while the larger fraction is added to the natural stores of carbon in the deep ocean. This process of increasing ocean productivity replicates natural nutrient upwellings from deep ocean water. An established Ocean Nourishment site in full


operation would sequester between five and eight Mt of


Ocean


Nourishment Benefits:


CO2 per annum (the global potential being in the order of


0.8 Gt/annum based on using nitrogen only) and lead to an increase in fisheries of some 300,000t (wet weight) per annum. Increasing the base of the marine food chain can support all the diverse elements of the marine environment and is an alternative to intensive land or sea- based monoculture farming.


Ocean nourishment feasibility studies The site investigation and feasibility study is a service offered by ONC to governments and private organisations who wish to explore the economic and humanitarian benefits of the patented Ocean Nourishment process. The study will determine whether the technology is potentially applicable for the proposed site or sites.


To request a feasibility proposal for your site/sites please contact our research team directly for a prompt response at: info@oceannourishment.com | www.oceannourishment.com


FAMILY OFFICE: ASIA TOMORROW 109


• food security • climate itigation • reduced ocean acidification


ALTERNATIVE INVESTMENTS


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