This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PHILANTHROPY Philanthropy, celebrity and the ‘new rich’ in China


The University of Technology Sydney’s China Research Centre is examining governance of the philanthropic sector and the recent emergence of celebrity philanthropy in China as a means to combat growing inequalities between the nation’s rich and poor.


A


lthough economic reform has lifted millions of Chinese citizens out of poverty and increased their access to health and education, rapid development has also created a growing divide between sections of society. In 1978,


China had a Gini Coefficient index (a commonly used measure of economic inequality) of 0.22, making it one the most egalitarian nations in the world – everyone was equally poor. However, an inevitable outcome of economic development has been that some sectors of the population have achieved wealth and fame, while others face new forms of social exclusion and systemic disadvantage due to the withdraw of former state provisions. China’s Gini Coefficient in 2010 was 0.47, making it one of the most unequal nations in the world.


Celebrity and new philanthropy Celebrity philanthropy and activism are growing fields of social inquiry, with famous figures such as rock star Bono and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates and his wife Melinda receiving worldwide recognition for their charitable efforts. Celebrity-backed campaigns have engaged the private sector by uniting some of the largest global brands to raise awareness and funds. New philanthropy, where celebrities use their public visibility,


brand credibility and personal wealth via structured and strategic means to support good causes, is different from the traditional practice of the rich and famous “giving back” through means such as writing checks at charity functions. Instead, serious celebrities and rich philanthropists take an active management role by establishing institutionalized, businesslike transnational models of giving, operating through foundations that employ professional philanthropic advisers based on transparency, performance analysis and public accountability. Philanthropy by the rich and famous offers real solutions to


the problem of unequal wealth distribution, meeting the health, education and other basic welfare needs of all people in society. It also fosters a public culture of participation and private philanthropy by everyday individuals through the provision of media role models.


100 FAMILY OFFICE: ASIA TOMORROW


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148