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DOORS&WINDOWS MASTERDOR CRACKS THE THERMAL CODE


Door-sets from Manse Masterdor with U-Values of 1.0W/m2K are being fitted into one of the UK’s biggest ever “Zero Carbon” social housing developments.


The £12 million Park Dale development


will meet Code for Sustainable Homes Level 6. The 91 homes in Airedale, near Castleford in West Yorkshire, are being built using traditional construction methods by Bramall Construction for Wakefield and District Housing and will feature 160 Masterdor Timber Thermal door-sets.


Part-funded by the Homes and Community


Agency (HCA), the two, three and four-bedroom homes will use a ground-breaking combination of energy saving and carbon-reducing features including mechanical ventilation and heat recovery systems, photovoltaic panels, and grey water recycling.


The 54mm Masterdor Timber Thermal


door-sets will deliver superior levels of air tightness (800 Special). The thermally efficient high security door-sets have an insulating core and also meet and exceed the requirements of PAS23, PAS24 and Secured by Design.


Jeremy Gaffney, Supply Chain Manager at Bramall Construction, said: “This is a very exciting code 6 development with a very high specification. We chose Masterdor because they offer a high thermal efficiency and excellent air tightness product. This has a positive impact


on reducing fuel bills and minimising CO2 emissions. The Masterdor has the added benefit of looking great and is available in a wide choice of styles and colours, which is really important to the social housing residents and clients.”


For further information about Manse Masterdor visit www.masterdor.co.uk.


DGCOS IS THE CLINCHER FOR OUTLOOK WINDOWS LTD


Hemel Hempstead installer Outlook Windows Ltd says that in over 60% of the work it has won, membership of the Double Glazing and Conservatory Ombudsman Scheme clinched the deal. Each and every customer completes a satisfaction questionnaire on completion of a job, and analysis of the feedback in the last eight months showed this remarkable figure.


Outlook Windows Ltd doesn’t use high-pressure sales tactics and most of its business comes from recommendations. When Director Colin Welling visits a potential customer he simply hands them the DGCOS information pack. “We are a very professional established company,” says Colin,


“and we are keen to maintain our reputation; we simply direct customers to www.dgcos.org.uk and ask them to call to check our credentials.


“In fact,” adds Colin, “we recently completed a job for a customer in Eddlesborough. It was a 60s bungalow and we fitted new doors and a couple of ‘A’ rated windows. The customer knew what he wanted – high quality workmanship and energy efficient, environmentally friendly products. He was a retired joiner and he demanded high standards – I could tell from the work he’d done in his house he was meticulous. He’d done some research and decided he would only give the job to a DGCOS member as he knew he would be


8 « Clearview South « September/October 2011 « www.clearview-uk.com A recent conservatory installation by DGCOS member Outlook.


protected and the company would be reputable and reliable.”


For more information on DGCOS visit www.dgcos.org.uk or call 0845 053 8975.


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