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DOORS&WINDOWS


ALUMINIUM PANELS CREATE COLOURFUL FAÇADE FOR NEW


MERSEYSIDE PRIMARY SCHOOL


Aluminium and Trespa faced panels from Panel Systems have been chosen to enhance the aesthetics of a stunning new environmentally- friendly Merseyside primary school, which is part of the Primary Capital Programme.


The panels were specified for the colourful, contemporary façade of Park


Brow Community Primary School in Kirkby, designed by 2020 Liverpool for Knowsley Metropolitan Borough Council. The 2,884 sq m building will also act as a hub for family learning and other activities to benefit the local community. The school, which has 420 pupils, plus 52 nursery places, opened in September 2011.


Dark Grey aluminium infill panels formed part of a curtain walling systems on the three main elevations of the building, as a contrast to Trespa cladding panels, which were specified in Anthracite Grey and contrasting warm, attractive hues of Gold Yellow and Orange Red with a matt finish. The aim was to create a visually engaging building appropriate to an educational setting, by providing a contrast of texture and colour. The infill panels achieve a U-value of 0.35 W/m2K and the building has been designed to achieve a ‘Very Good’ BREEAM rating.


Danny Phelan, Sales Manager for Panel Systems, said: “Our composite panels


were the perfect choice for this project as their assured thermal performance means they help to create low carbon buildings suitable for the 21st Century. The decorative Trespa face in three colours adds visual interest to the building. The panels had to meet exacting aesthetic and environmental credentials, as well as being supplied cut to size, in order to meet a tight build schedule in time for the new school year.”


Danny continues: “Our panels have been used extensively in modern educational buildings and Park Brow Primary School is an excellent example of the way in which the different colours can be used to create a unique design.


6 « Clearview South « September/October 2011 « www.clearview-uk.com


We worked with the contractor to produce bespoke panels which met the client’s precise requirements for sustainability, performance and aesthetics.”


Robert Brym, architect for 2020 Liverpool, said: “The façade of the building


is given interest and aesthetics through the use of different materials, changes in depth and colours and contrast between scale, mass and void, orientation and transparency.


Within the designated budget, the design solutions are of


the highest quality in being attractive, distinctive and inspirational to all users of the facilities.”


The panels were manufactured with either a powder coated Aluminium or


Trespa face which is vacuum bonded to a core of Styrofoam. Composite panels are typically specified when aesthetic considerations are paramount. Panel Systems’ bespoke service means that our panels can be supplied to specific sizes and edge details to suit individual glazing systems and achieve U values as low as 0.10 W/m2K.


Park Brow Primary School has been designed to minimise carbon emissions


by using technologies including digitally controlled lighting and a biomass boiler. The building has also been orientated to maximise the use of natural daylight.


Aluglaze from Panel Systems has been supplied to a wide variety of commercial, educational and healthcare environments.


Panel Systems manufactures a full range of bespoke composite panels that are used to create aesthetically striking and thermally efficient buildings. The company also supplies and fabricates a range of external cladding materials, including Trespa panels, Rockwood Rockpanel, Eternit Natura, Alucobond and MEG External laminate.


For more information, visit the website www.aluglaze.co.uk or call direct on: 0114 249 5635.


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