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/// ARTPRIZE


ARTPRIZE: FURTHER ON UP THE ROAD


by Kelli Kolakowski | kelli@revuewm.com


ArtPrize organizers used ideas for centralizing art (exhibition cen- ters), but the result was more people in one place vying to cast their views on more than 25 works of art. If the chaos and crowds that surround ArtPrize have you feeling a bit claustrophobic, here’s a remedy: venues that are off the beaten path and guarantee some sweet art in a more intimate atmosphere. Though they may not house dozens of entries, they do host artists whose work is worth taking a walk to encounter.


CITY ART GALLERY 1168 Ionia NW


cityartgr.com Hosting: 23 artists


and ArtPrize artist Pamela Weston is excited for the new gallery’s first ArtPrize undertaking. “I really look forward to meeting all the art-


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ists,” she said. “Some we’ve gone back and forth in e-mails or by phone. I really feel like I already know them ... a lot of people we’re going to have here haven’t been in ArtPrize before or haven’t even shown their work much at all.” Gallery visitors can expect to see art indoors


and out, including Jean Lash’s colorful origami art, Matt Malott and Jenny Venema’s lifelike draw-


PHOTO: PAMELA WESTON 52 | REVUEWM.COM | OCTOBER 2011


ity Art Gallery not only hosts 23 artists during ArtPrize, but displays a variety of mediums and work. Gallery board member


ings, Steve Arver’s wooden table, Pamela Weston’s ceramic sculpture and photography by Laurie Tennent. But perhaps one of the most exciting works will be viewed in the gallery’s parking lot, where German artist Edgar Mueller will transform pavement by use of various paints, to create an enormous optical illusion. The artist’s past works have included a giant crevasse, lava burst and waterfall. “We were looking for a range of medium,”


Weston said. “We knew we didn’t have a lot of space for some of the big installations ... Some of the work is really high quality but are smaller pieces. We wanted to highlight quality work.” Visitors can take advantage of the gallery’s


parking lot space, garden, two restrooms and handicapped accessibility.


BOARDWALK CONDOS 940 Monroe Ave. NW


boardwalkgr.com Hosting: 3 artists


parking and the convenience of food and drink, Boardwalk Condos is a great starting point for an ArtPrize adventure. When deciding which artwork to display,


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Exhibition Director Shauna Rajah admits she set out looking for 3-D pieces that viewers could essentially walk around, enabling them a well- angled view, but ended up with a 2-D piece as well. She chose “untitled (non-linear waveform),” a sci-fi sculpture made of recycled scrap paper,


hough it hosts just three artists for ArtPrize 2011, Boardwalk Condos is a venue not to miss. With art inside and out, opportune


glue and paint, by Bernard Klevickas, Randall Max Yaw’s “Human Topography-Three Figures,” welded life-size human figures of steel and wood, and Chris Kienke’s “Exit Number 6,” a mixed media painting incorporating digital imagery. As this is her first year pulling together an


ArtPrize exhibition, Rajah anticipates what the competition will bring to the Monroe Avenue area. “Our whole area has been working together


to get more people down there with a lot of cool venues with a lot of cool art in them,” she said. “It’s nice because everything isn’t jammed in and you have a nice view in front of the river.” Boardwalk boasts free night and weekend


parking in the Canal Lot across from the condos, public access to JD Reardon’s Bar & Grill and a chance to hear the artists discuss their work in an open reception.


PHOTO: COURTESY BOARDWALK CONDOS


SCHEDULE | DINING |SIGHTS


SOUNDS | SCENE


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