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148 SECTOR-BY-SECTOR OPPORTUNITIES


The guiding principles decided upon by the AU to enable the successful implementation of the Plan of Action are:  ensuring enhanced political support, especially at national levels, but also at regional, continental and international levels;  concentration on strategic issues, the implementation of which will make a significant difference at member-state and regional levels;  enhancing mutual assistance among African states as the norm;  enhancing the capacities of RECs and national focal points: this will involve a needs assessment of national and regional implementing agencies, and appropriate capacity-building in such areas as program-cycle


SADC Regional Education and Training Implementation Plan, one of the various programs that seeks to integrate the Second Decade Plan of Action with the work of the RECs and to review progress towards the MDG.


Then, in May 2011, African education ministers met in Nairobi, Kenya, for the First Extraordinary session of the Conference of Ministers of Education of the AU (COMEDAF) to discuss the theme of “preparations for launching the Pan-African University (PAU)”, before the AU Summit in July, and to consider the “Africa Regional Convention for the Mutual Recognition of degrees and qualifications in Higher Education”. The meeting emphasized the need for more investment in education.


Other topics under consideration at the meeting were: the Pan African Conference on Teacher Development (PACTED); the April 2011 meeting of the Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA); and a meeting on the School Feeding Program, seen as critical in improving children’s nutritional levels in order to improve school attendance and to enhance pupils’ attention and performance levels.


A volunteer and a local teacher help young Ghanaian students with their lessons


Centre of excellence The PAU is a complex, challenging and ambitious project to establish a continental centre of excellence in education that will enable national development goals to be pursued through the provision of academic programs. PAU currently offers graduate


management, monitoring and evaluation, data-gathering and statistics;  establishing strong and effective mechanisms for monitoring;


 avoiding the creation of new structures – capitalizing on existing structures and supporting their capacity-building and reform to accommodate new imperatives;  establishing as common practice the documentation, sharing and celebration of positive experiences and successful initiatives among member states.


March 2010 saw the Southern African Development


Community (SADC) education ministers meet in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, with AUC representative Professor Jean Pierre Ezin to review the implementation of the


INVEST IN AFRICA 2011


programs in business through the Lagos Business School and School of Media and Communications. Speaking at COMEDAF, Kenyan Education Minister Professor Sam Ongeri said, “The PAU is the culmination of continental initiatives of the Commission of the AU to revitalize higher education and research in Africa. It is a project that will exemplify excellence; enhance the attractiveness and global competitiveness of African higher education and research; and establish the African University at the core of Africa’s development.” In 2009, the AUC signed a Memorandum of


Understanding (MoU) to formalize substantive cooperation with Fairleigh Dickinson University (FDU) in the United States. The MoU sets out a plan to develop educational opportunities for FDU students, identify and provide technical expertise for the AU, and jointly explore ventures to support and advance higher


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