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Smashing Windows can change the


look of your house S


ince it began trading, Smashing Windows has replaced nearly 20,000 double-glazed


sealed units, usually because condensation has formed inside. Condensation forms due to the seal around the


edge of the double-glazed unit breaking down and letting in air, which contains varying degrees of moisture, and when the unit cools down at night this moisture has nowhere to go and condenses against the glass inside the unit. These misty or broken units are taken out of


the frames and new ones put in their place, so no need to replace the frame. The firm can replace the double-glazed units in most types of frames, such as Upvc, aluminium or wood. Smashing Windows can change the look of your house. Over the years the business has seen an increase in the number of customers wanting to change the style or the look of their house, or even exchange their glass for more energy efficient units.


Using the concept explained above staff take


out your existing units from the frames and replace them with the same size units, but incorporate within the new ones perhaps Georgian bars, lead diamonds or lead squares. This can add value and character to an


otherwise ―bland‖ looking house, and only the front of the property need be upgraded. Smashing Windows even caters for those little


problems that occur, maybe new hinges, handles, window and door mechanisms, or even fitting cat and dog flaps – no job is too small. For a free quote telephone Smashing Windows


on 01296 630650, or go online and enter the details to give you a better idea of what the cost will be. If instead you are after new doors and


windows, maybe secondary glazing or perhaps just a new front door or back door, the firm is Certass registered and can provide you a free quote for just one unit or the whole house. All our installations are covered by an insurance-backed guarantee.


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