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Coach House cafe popular with locals


I


t has only been open a couple of months but already the Coach House is proving popular


with Hunton Bridge locals. The coffee shop, which is owned by the


neighbouring King‘s Head, has been created as part of the recent redevelopment of the landmark pub. Coach House manager Sam Grunsell said the


café, which is built in an old stable, had an old- fashioned setting but a bright and modern feel. She said: ―We came up with the idea because


there is nothing within Hunton Bridge that is a coffee shop, so the basic thing is that it has a village atmosphere with people dropping in for a quick cuppa. ―Everyone has said it‘s really lovely how it


looks and feels.‖ Adorning the walls are paintings by local


artists. Old-fashioned sweets, cakes, muffins, Danish


pastries, teacakes and paninis are available to accompany a lovely cup of tea or coffee. Sam said she hoped the café would prove popular with parents from the nearby St Paul‘s School, noting


there was plenty of space for kids to run around outside, with play equipment and football goals installed. There are also children‘s toys and books in the shop. The Coach House was already proving popular


with canal boaters, cyclists and walkers, because of its proximity to the canal. Attached to the coffee house is a function room, which is already receiving bookings for events like Christenings and group meetings. It seats 30 comfortably, or up to


60 people standing. The Coach House is open from 10am to 5pm Monday to Friday and from 10am until 3pm on weekends.


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