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Challenging


University Fees With tuition fees set to skyrocket next


year, debate is raging about the cost – and merits – of a university degree. Parmiter’s pupil Ellen Kydd is wrestling with the issue.


U


niversity. The gateway to the world of knowledge, deeper understanding, and


ultimately a better career in the future? If this is the case, why are students being charged two arms and two legs to learn? Is it right that education is a one-way road to debt? Surely not. As a 15-year-old GCSE student, I am currently


considering my future options, trying to decipher what is best in terms of cost, and indeed which is most suited to my abilities. Do I opt for an apprenticeship, a seemingly


more popular choice in recent times; or maybe gain some work experience in areas that interest me – this has already supplied me with a job that has taught me plenty. Or do I go head-first into definite debt, and choose a higher education with a more expensive university? The latter is not looking optimistic. In my opinion, an education is an important


part of everybody‘s life, and young people especially should be encouraged to increase their knowledge. After all, with the rapid development of society


today – such as new cures for illnesses, the solutions for global warming and many more improvements – human curiosity and intelligence has never been stronger. So why should those with the potential to


make a huge difference be held back simply because they cannot afford higher education? Despite this desire for higher education, I also feel that ―my generation‖ has been raised to


believe that getting a degree is the only way to achieve a good career. Even when I was eight, I remember thinking


that in order to be ―clever and rich‖, I should go to university. Ironically, now I am approaching the age


where I have the option to attend one, the idea of ―becoming rich‖ seems to be rapidly disappearing due to the fees, and I am in fear of facing years of debt in the future. This complicated new system has led me to


confusion, along with the majority of my friends and many other people. I am in favour of progression, and improving


schemes where necessary, but is this really improvement? Or will it result in further frustration over the expensive matter? For now, we should be glad the costs aren‘t any higher.


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