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Institution of Lighting Professionals


Don't forget to book your place at this years unmissable event - ILP Annual Conference and Exhibition, entitled ‘Sustainability in Lighting’. This is the ideal event to meet fellow lighting professionals, gain and share knowledge on important topics, discover exciting new products and develop your competencies and skills.


This years


conference will take place at the Majestic Hotel in Harrogate on 28th-30th September. To book your place at this event please visit www.theilp.org.uk/sustain where you will also find the full programme.


www.theilp.org.uk L 46


News from the key industry bodies When is a pot a hazard, and when is it not?


ighting Association


For more information contact Janet Lee on 01952 290 905 email janetl@lightingassociation.com


www.lightingassociation.com


The Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive (RoHS) has thrown up some strange anomalies in the decorative lighting industry.


For example, a ceramic vase that is food safe may contain lead or cadmium in the glaze but as long as it passes the acid test required for containing foods for human consumption it is entirely legal. Now, convert it into a table lamp and it becomes illegal. Not because it is electrically unsafe, but because the glaze is now considered hazardous.


Here’s another example: a piece of tiffany coloured glass soldered together with full lead solder is perfectly legal as an ornament, but if it is a light fitting it must contain lead free solder which can drive the price up by as much as 70%. Add to that the oddity that a tiffany lampshade sold separately from a table lamp base for example can contain full lead solder but sell it with the base and it now doesn’t comply. Finally there is an exemption for high quantities of lead in crystal glass used in lighting, but if there is a lower quantity the product does not qualify for the exemption and might be illegal.


These are clearly unintended consequences of a well-intended law, but it is costing the decorative lighting industry a great deal of money to comply, and lost business where they can’t. Couple this with strong market surveillance in the UK by the National Measurement Office, and virtually non-existent surveillance elsewhere in Europe and the UK industry is not on a level playing field.


The Lighting Association is in discussions with the Department of Business Innovation and Skills, the National Measurement Office and CELMA, the European association representing the industry to apply for exemptions to address these anomalies.


www.a1lightingmagazine.com


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