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Advertorial Harvard leads the way


Harvard Engineering has recently moved into new premises, in Normanton, Wakefield in West Yorkshire. The premises were officially opened by HRH The Duke of Kent on 12th May 2011. The Duke also presented Harvard with a Queen’s Award for Enterprise - within the innovation category – which the company won for its innovative LeafNut street lighting control system. The new facility includes a world class research and development centre where all the company’s innovative ideas will be realised into new products and solutions, a manufacturing plant with the most advanced automated assembly equipment in the industry, large open plan offices and a showroom. Leading the way, Harvard has installed the entire facility with a number of its own solutions. Products that will help the company save energy, keep electricity bills to a minimum, as well as reduce CO2 emissions. DALI LED drivers from Harvard’s CoolLED range are installed throughout the facility. Harvard’s DALI drivers deliver high performance and high efficiency dimming control for high-brightness LEDs. The dimmable LED drivers provide dimming capabilities across a wide range of output currents, which means that Harvard can maximise energy savings and create different levels of lighting by smoothly dimming LEDs at specific times. The DALI drivers allow Harvard to use intelligent digital programming to set different lighting levels at set times in all areas of the premises. Being motion activated, the drivers also turn the lights completely off, should a room be empty, meaning no energy is wasted. By installing the lights in their showroom, Harvard can also show visitors how the drivers work, accurately demonstrating the benefits of implementing them, by using their own premises as a case study. Outside in the car park, Harvard has also installed its innovative LeafNut street lighting monitoring and control system. LeafNut provides complete control and monitoring over individual or groups of street lights. Controlled via a computer, laptop or even a smart phone, the system can dim street lights as well as provide reports on individual lamps. The lights in the car park can be dimmed at times when it is not in use and returned to a higher level when employees are working


“We have grown significantly over the last few years to meet the growing market demand for our products. Excitingly and despite the current recession, we are anticipating our growth to continue in 2011, at an even faster pace than we have over the last few years.” Michael McDonnell, sales and marketing director at Harvard Engineering


late night shifts for safety. The installation also allows Harvard to highlight to customers exactly how the LeafNut system works on an actual street lighting installation. The LeafNut solution has been adopted by more than 60 local authorities worldwide, with 400,000 LeafNut controlled street lights being deployed and 100,000 already in operation. Michael McDonnell, sales and marketing director at Harvard Engineering, commented, “We have grown significantly over the last few years to meet the growing market demand for our products. Excitingly and despite the current recession, we are anticipating our growth to continue in 2011, at an even faster pace than we have over the last few years.” He added, “Not only is LED lighting becoming more widely used but an increasing number of local authorities are looking for innovative applications like LeafNut, to manage their street lights. Due to growing demand for both LeafNut and CoolLED, we are also opening new offices in Australia, USA and Italy.” As well as LeafNut and CoolLED products, Harvard supplies HID, fluorescent and emergency lighting ballasts.


Contact


Harvard Engineering T: +44 (0) 113 383 1000 W: www.HarvardEng.com


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