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IT & Communication


KEY STAKEHOLDER & SERVICE PROVIDERS, Health plans


Care Providers Pharmacies Retailers TV


Other service providers


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INTEGRATED HEALTH MANAGEMENT PLATFORM


• Service Integration • Experience Optimization • Channel Management • Orchestration Interactions


Mobile


Health Consumers Patients Citizens


Channels Web


Incompatible technology standards There are also unresolved techni- cal issues with respect to stand- ards, security, privacy, and other regulatory matters. The industry’s slow progress in agreeing to stand- ards is problematic as compre- hensive solutions typically call for diverse devices and systems to work together to address the unique and complex needs of an individual patient. In an Accenture in-depth study of mHealth, an industry leader observed that there are “device class standards or end-to-end standards. Every network requires individual certification. There are no standards for Wi-Fi or the wireless personal area network. This fragmentation poses significant problems.”


Prohibitive regulatory restrictions Privacy is also a concern of patients and regulators. While social network- ing sites like PatientsLikeMe or Face- book fan pages for medications and brands encourage users to share medical details, that disclosure is


34 INSIGHT ON


HOSPITAL & HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT Vol. 1 Issue 2 August 2011


voluntary. User-managed reposi- tories for medical records such as Microsoft HealthVault have had some success, but Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act regula- tions in the US are still barriers to efficient exchange of health infor- mation among networks of third parties. All of these challenges can be


addressed with concerted efforts. Networks of mHealth providers that are flexible, well-funded and clear about the added value they deliver in improving care will be most able to gain regulatory approval and market traction to overcome these barriers.


Conclusion There exists a myriad of opportuni- ties and various levels of involvement for the Healthcare Industry to partici- pate in mHealth. Most mHealth prod- ucts and services will fall into two types of categories—stand-alone and comprehensive. Accenture asserts that the early part of the mHealth evolution will be primarily charac- terized by independent, stand-alone


solutions but will evolve to a more integrated approach with a blend of stand-alone and comprehensive solutions. It will eventually move to a stage where comprehensive solu- tions that improve patient outcomes will be pervasive. Now is the time to decide what that role will be in order to derive the maximum benefits from related changes and investments.


References: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Preven- tion. National Health Interview Survey. 2008. www.cdc.gov/nchs/health_poli- cy/adult_chronic_conditions.htm 2. Beers MH, Sliwkowski J, Brooks J. Com- pliance with medication orders among the elderly after hospital discharge. Hospital Formulary. 1992; (27(7): 720-724. 3. MobiHealthNews. Texting improves Type 1 Diabetes Adherence. August 10, 2010. http://mobihealthnews. com/8599/texting-imrpoves-type-1- diabetes-adherence/ 4. New England Healthcare Institute. Remote Physiological Monitoring: In- novation in the Management of Health Failure. July 2004.


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