This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
IT & Communication


SIDEBAR: The Evolution of mHealth in the United States Mobility is a key component of a biopharmaceuticals overall digital strategy and will play a critical role in connect- ing multiple, currently disparate stakeholders in the healthcare industry including patients, payers, providers, medical device companies, governments and regulators. As these entities come together, mHealth will go through a maturation process from stand-alone initiatives to the point where mHealth is pervasive through the industry.


INDEPENDENT ADOPTION


• Consumer adoption of stand-alone capabilities via mobile devices, e.g., tablets, smartphones, ect.


• Pilots of mHealth ini- tiatives with providers and large employers


CHARACTERISTICS


• Multiple mobile appli- cations or capabilities for specific functions {e.g., adherence, PERS, etc.}


• Technology plat- forms that support remote monitoring for target conditions {e.g., diabetes, heart disease}


CHARACTERISTICS


• Technological and clinical feasibility


INTEGRATED


• Penetration with major payers (and IDNs) for disease areas.


• Incorporated into clinical trials and outcomes studies


• "Closed loop" capabil- ities supported broad- based platforms and niche providers.


• Integrated with elec- tronic medical records (EMRs). reimburse- ment processes, pre- dictive coaching and communications


• Reimbursement for mobile platform- related activities delivering improved outcomes


Source: Accenture 2011 Even as mHealth products and


services continue to evolve, it is becoming clear that most will fall into two distinct categories: 1) stand-alone products and services, or 2) compre- hensive solutions. Stand-alone solu- tions and devices are focused on specific functions, diseases or data collection such as Glucose monitors for diabetics or ingestible ‘smart pills’ that track medication compliance. In contrast, comprehensive mHealth solutions have broader healthcare


32 INSIGHT ON


HOSPITAL & HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT Vol. 1 Issue 2 August 2011


delivery applications and will include an extensive network of stakeholders to support and provide care. Stand-alone products or services To date, much of the innovation


and investment in mHealth relates to stand-alone solutions because it is easier to bring a discreet product or service developed for an identifiable target segment to the market. The value and benefits would be easier to explain and the implementation can be streamlined. Current examples


of stand-alone mHealth products or services include, but are not limited to: • A portable electrocardiogram heart monitoring device for at-home use that measures only 4” x 3” and weighs 3.5 oz.;


• A smart shirt with embedded sensors continuously monitors more than 30 physiological signs, including respiration, posture and cardiac function;


• ‘Home cams’ or other inexpensive PERVASIVE


• Standard of care for designated diseases; consolidation of plat- forms across payers and providers


• Embedded device capabilites (e.g., implanted/ingested) that extend function- ality and/or monitor behaviors


• Cost-effective scaling across healthcare stakeholders


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56