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IT & Communication


complying with FDA rules.


- Techniques were suggested on ways to collect the information directly and simplify the process, includ- ing the usage of consumer-friendly language.


- The ability to recognize and capture the required information for an adverse event remains a challenge. Rules and guidelines are needed with regard to how liable life scienc- es companies are when they listen to their customers.


- Life sciences companies expressed interest in monitoring their custom- ers for trends while containing exposure to increased risks. Companies should design their


commercial strategies to incorporate adverse event reporting as an integral part of their social media campaigns.


What is the roi for Increased Customer engagement? Measuring ROI for social media, even outside of life sciences, remains difficult. For life sciences companies, where customers are often not able to buy their products directly, this added layer prevents direct track- ing. ROI can be partially quanti- fied through increased product and brand awareness but should not be the main goal for social media. The greater benefit is increased market insight, driving a positive effect on the product lifecycle, and deep- er personalized relationships for increased customer engagement. Despite the difficulty in measur-


ing ROI, social media offers a strong cost benefit compared to other forms, due to its low infrastructural cost for tool development and maintenance, especially for developing countries or smaller niche markets.


Failure to Execute Social media Well Life sciences companies have often failed to implement Health 2.0


28 INSIGHT ON


HOSPITAL & HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT Vol. 1 Issue 2 August 2011


well, treating it as a traditional one-way communication method. In response, patients and physicians ignore those companies’ efforts, resulting in low engagement.


A Partner to Successfully Help You Integrate Health 2.0 into Your Commercial Strategies Capgemini Consulting has the expe- rience to assist life sciences compa- nies with designing and implement- ing Health 2.0 strategies (see Figure 7). Short-term opportunities include outreach to KOLs and POLs via social media, creation of a Health 2.0 company vision, or development of mobile applications for increased compliance or outreach in devel- oping countries. A long-term strat- egy would integrate social media throughout the organization, from R&D to commercialization. With our experience in accelerating transfor- mation, Capgemini Consulting can help life sciences leverage Health 2.0 as an essential element of its overall commercial strategies and marketing plans.


References 1. “How America Searches: Health and Wellness,” iCrossing, January 2008. 2. “Drug Makers to Press for Guidance on Web Marketing,” Wall Street Journal, November 12, 2009, p B4. 3. Source: Twitter. Retrieved on July 6, 2011.


4. “The Pharma-Twitter Experiment: How Brands Can Achieve a 14% Response Rate,” The Kru Report: e-Patient Con- nections, July 2009. 5. “Physicians’ Perspective: Digital Tools and the Pharmaceutical Sales Representative,” Sermo survey results, collected June 2011. 6. “Physicans in 2012: The Outlook for On Demand, Mobile, and Social Digital Media,” Manhattan Research, 2009. 7. “Battle with Heart Disease Moves to the Doctor’s Office,” Wall Street Journal, November 10, 2009, p. D4. 8. “UCB and PatientsLikeMe Partner to Give People With Epilepsy a Voice in Advancing Research” June 15, 2009, http://www.patientslikeme.com/ press/20090615/18-ucb-and-patients- likeme-partner-to-give-people-with-ep- ilepsy-a-voice-in-advancing-research; “UCB-sponsored PatientsLikeMe Site is Live,” PharmExec.com, George Koro- neos, Jan 27, 2010.


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