This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
by Mallory McKnight COMEDY


At The B.O.B. Grand Rapids, MI 616.356.2000


www.thebob.com


From Clarinet to Comedy


DAN GRUETER September 1 - 3


T


GREG WARREN September 8 - 10


CARL LABOVE September 15 - 17


HE MAN STANDING UNDER the blinding lights discussing the finer points of airline food is the stereotypical comedian. The standard subjects, stuff anyone with a basic knowledge acquired walking the earth, seem the broadest targets and the surest punch lines.


That is not comedian Greg Warren’s style. An expert in the comedy


of the personal, Warren’s stand-up is a collection of anecdotes from his very particular childhood and the observations of a Midwesterner made good. “It’s mostly abbreviated stories from my life,” Warren said. “They


usually end with me being made fun of.” A self-deprecating look at his dual


GREG WARREN Dr. Grins, Grand Rapids Sept. 8-10, show times at 8, 9 and 10:30 p.m. $10-$15 thebob.com, (616) 356-2000


high school identity, a varsity wrestler and a clarinetist, provides the material for his most famous bit, “Flute Man.” Warren parlayed an appearance on “The Bob & Tom Show,” into a reoccurring gig based mostly on the audience’s appetite for the “Flute Man” bit during best-of episodes. “(Bob & Tom) is probably the best thing that’s happened to my career,” he


said. “Now, it’s almost like talking to family every time I do the show.” Warren is especially proud of his connection with the show. The


radio show reminds him of the post-collegiate job – a Pringle salesman – he held before diving headfirst into his comedy career. “Driving to work, people feel a bit vulnerable and depressed,” he


said. “You end up forming a pretty tight bond with the radio show you listen to … and Bob & Tom was that for me.” Whatever career boosts and camaraderie the show provided Warren,


it also provided him with a fairly unflattering nickname. While out on tour with the show, they noticed a pattern of behavior with Warren during the post-show feeding frenzy of comics and their groupies.


Greg Warren “They call me the “Uncloser,” he said, laughing. “I am not very


effective with women after the show.” Warren will have a chance to test those ineffective moves in Grand


Rapids, where he has performed extensively. “Oh, I’ve had a lot of fun there,” he said. Although a man raised of a dual nature, Warren seems to have


found a home in comedy, away from bullying wrestlers and aspiring musician. However, he still holds a little love for the clarinet. “I play it very, very seldom, but it’s always interesting when I do,”


he said. n


Other Comedy Events | by Lindsay Patton-Carson


Brian Regan DeVos Performance Hall, Grand Rapids; Oct. 1, 8 p.m. $39.50; devosperformancehall.com, (616) 742-6500


THEGILMORECOLLECTION.COM KYLE DUNNIGAN


September 22 - 24 Brian Regan 72 | REVUEWM.COM | SEPTEMBER 2011


Straight edge is the new black — at least to Brian Regan, who boasts his own brand of clean comedy. Instead of getting laughs out of shock and grit, Regan uses scenarios that everyday Americans can relate to. He shows visible frustration onstage while he describes the hassle of sending out packages through UPS and the stress of going through the vision tests at the eye doc- tor. In December 2010, Regan released his comedy album, All By Myself, exclusively on his website. Since the release, he’s been touring nonstop and has tour dates scheduled through February 2012.


SCHEDULE | DINING |SIGHTS


SOUNDS | SCENE


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