This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Maps & Atlases /// MUSIC FESTIVALS


THE INDIE EXPERIENCE


| by Garrett Dennert, Robby Hartley and Lindsay Patton-Carson I


NDIE ROCK IS TAKING OVER Michigan this fall in the form of four festivals that are similar in genre, but very different in lineups. Reaching its third year, Indie Rock Fest


will take place in Grand Haven on Sept. 23 and 24 and will feature several local indie


bands from Michigan to play over the course of two nights. The event will adopt a different approach than previous


years, becoming a traditional music festival instead of a compe- tition – formerly labeled the “Indie Rock Invitational.” 2010 IRI winner Bangups will return to Grand Haven for


the event along with 2010 IRI participant Lazy Genius, hailing from Grand Rapids. Other confirmed acts from GR include Nathan Kalish and the Wildfire and Four Finger Five. “In Grand Haven, there’s not much original music,” said


Mike Coleman, event coordinator and general manager of several Grand Haven restaurants. “It’s all kind of beach, top 40,


62 | REVUEWM.COM | SEPTEMBER 2011


or classic rock kind of stuff, so it’s kind of fun doing something you’d find in Grand Rapids or Kalamazoo or in bigger cities.” Over in Kalamazoo, the Boiling Pot Festival (Sept. 29-Oct.


1) looks to pick up where it left off by bringing a diverse, mostly local lineup. “Last year was a big learning experience,” said Chris


Walters, marketing director of the festival. “This year, instead of a two-day festival, it’s three, and not only does it focus on the music, but on the community.” Boiling Pot is working closely with local charities, and also


includes a long list of local brewers for the festival. The artists come from all over the Midwest, though many of the perform- ers are from Michigan. While many of the performers are new to the festival, Breathe Owl Breathe returns to the Arcadia Creek Festival Place this year. Also on the bill: Maps & Atlases, Flatfoot 56, Mustard Plug and others. That same weekend, Midwest Fest (Sept. 27-Oct. 1) will return to Rubble’s Bar in Mt. Pleasant.


The event started in Mt. Pleasant by sole creator Corey


Densmore in May of 2008 to showcase a multitude of local and established indie talent from the Midwest. It stayed in Mt. Pleasant for another summer before relocating to Grand Rapids in July 2010. “The only reason it ever really left Mt. Pleasant was because


hosting a festival in July in a college town just wasn’t cutting it. Now that it’s in September, it made more sense to hold it back in Mt. Pleasant with the abundance of students around with nothing much else to do but go to class and drink on the weekends. Midwest Fest is giving them some great music to enjoy while drinking. It’s a win/win,” Densmore said. Headliners include Frontier Ruckus, Chris Bathgate,


Stepdad and The High Strung. Rounding out the holy indie fest trinity that’s happening


in late September is Prospecto Musical Showcase and Sonic Experience (Sept. 30-Oct. 2). Prospecto, which is in its second year, boasts a few changes


in 2011 – a result of critiques made in 2010, its inaugural year. Instead of having 10 venues host the dozens of bands coming to Grand Rapids, organizers of the three-day music fest have whittled the number of venues down to three: The Pyramid Scheme, Intersection and Founders, which are all within walk- ing distance of each other. “Ten venues made it difficult to see a lot of the acts,” said


Benjamin Hunter, creative director for Prospecto. Headlining the festival will be George Clinton and The


Parliament-Funkadelic, The Walkmen, The Pharcyde, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. and Javelin, among other national and local acts. n


SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100